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picxie
07-23-2007, 04:00
Can anyone explain, in laymans terms, the different finning techniques? Or does anyone have a link with concise descriptions?


And which technique do you find in different circumstances?

fire diver
07-23-2007, 08:46
Can anyone explain, in laymans terms, the different finning techniques? Or does anyone have a link with concise descriptions?


And which technique do you find in different circumstances?
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>Well, recreational divers, who had very poor instructors will usually bicycle kick. The typical rec diver uses the standard flutter kick. </DIV>
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>Then there is the modified flutter. Bend your knees so your fins are up behind you, and use your ankles the flutter just the fins.</DIV>
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>Then there is the frog kick. Ive seen this done "whole leg" just like a frog, and I've seen it done with just the feet/ankles. It's a great kick to use, and you can vary that method based on whether you are in open water, or a confined, silty area.</DIV>
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>Then there is the hilcopter kick, used for turning a zero radius circle</DIV>
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<DIV>And lastly (and most difficult for me) is the back kick. For those times you want or need to back up without turning around.</DIV>
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<DIV>Sorry, I lost all my links to the kick demos. Do a google search for "DIR kick techniques" should get you what you want</DIV>
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<DIV>FD</DIV>

PlatypusMan
07-23-2007, 10:23
Found some links that are interesting: what are your thoughts?

An article on finning. (http://www.divernet.com/cgi-bin/articles.pl?id=5453&sc=&ac=d&an=)

Finning video (about halfway down the page). (http://www.divetekadventures.com/Images.htm)

More DIR style finning videos--also about halfway down the page. (http://www.deepsouthdivers.org/training.html)

tc_rain
07-23-2007, 10:30
This is how I learned some of the different kicks
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>More DIR style finning videos--also about halfway down the page. (http://www.deepsouthdivers.org/training.html)</DIV>
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>I still wish they were taught in the AOW class. They could replace one of the elective dives with this. </DIV>

WaterRat
07-23-2007, 10:54
I guess my frog and modified flutter are OK. Still haven't been able to reverse kick and my helicopter is half a$$ed. Lots of practice needed on that. I hope to take a fundies course early next year. That should help straighten out any problems.
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<DIV>Ron</DIV>

Ajuva
07-23-2007, 15:11
Great Link.
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<DIV>Will practice these this weekend!</DIV>

creggur
07-23-2007, 15:39
Not to hijack your thread, but will these techniques work with split-fins like my Tusa Zooms?

fire diver
07-23-2007, 17:31
Not to hijack your thread, but will these techniques work with split-fins like my Tusa Zooms?
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>They will still work, but would have less power. Remember splits are based on the model of lots of really easy repitions. Paddle fins are fewer, harder reps. The experts say that for the flutter kicker, the splits are a more efficient fin. I don't know, I've never tried them.</DIV>
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>FD</DIV>

picxie
07-24-2007, 04:17
Found some links that are interesting: what are your thoughts?

An article on finning. (http://www.divernet.com/cgi-bin/articles.pl?id=5453&sc=&ac=d&an=)

Finning video (about halfway down the page). (http://www.divetekadventures.com/Images.htm)

More DIR style finning videos--also about halfway down the page. (http://www.deepsouthdivers.org/training.html)


<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>That article is great, thanks!</DIV>
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<DIV>I can do the helicopter quite easily ... and I can 'lie' on my back and go backwards ... hehe. The frog kick looks a bit complicated though!</DIV>

georoc01
07-24-2007, 08:32
I agree with TC_Rain that it would be good to have some of this in the AOW class. Of course, as I have done some more shallow shore diving, that frog kick becomes more critical
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>And I do have TUSA Zooms and all of the kicks still work, but you get far more power out of a modified flutter than do you a frog.</DIV>
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>One of my instructors uses a dolphin kick most of the time. Which would add another to the list.</DIV>

picxie
07-24-2007, 14:33
<DIV>One of my instructors uses a dolphin kick most of the time. Which would add another to the list.</DIV>
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>What's a dolphin kick?</DIV>

CompuDude
07-24-2007, 17:00
Re Splits: It's simple physics. You can do most of the kicks with them (although backwards is darn near impossible, only a handful of people have managed it), but they are far less efficient than paddle fins are for everything except the flutter kick, which is what they were designed to do from the ground up.

Flutter kick: Splits rock the casbah. Paddles do them too, but less efficiently with much wasted power. (Ditto for mod. flutter)

Frog kick: Paddles rock the casbah. Huge surface area to scoop the water back. Splits can do it, but because of the split their surface area is greatly reduced, and unlike a flutter, the water that passes through the split is vectored incorrectly to help. So it works, but not as fast and with less thrust. (Ditto for mod. frog)

Helicopter. It can be done in splits, but it's tougher. The inner edge of the split tents to catch the water wrong and create drag where you don't want it. Again, paddles win because their one surface can be angled just right.

Backwards: You guessed it, paddles win. Splits aren't designed to be pushed trailing edge first into the water, and they tend to catch an angle and splay out, completely destroying the kick. I have no idea how some (very few) have managed to to a backwards kick in them.

jacewindu
07-24-2007, 17:41
dolphin kick is where your ankles stay close together and your two legs move as one to propel yourself forward. it's less of a 'leg' motion and more of a whole body motion.

when i was learning butterfly, i was told that you can imagine moving your chest up and down vertically in the water. by doing this, your hips and legs will follow almost like an underwater snaking motion. clearly, the name comes from the dolphin, and in fact, the dolphin kick is the fastest kick you can do underwater (at least from a pure swimming perspective - scuba gear makes it fairly clumsy at times)

if you've ever seen a monofin (sometimes deep free-divers use these) it basically locks your feet inches apart in the fin's boots, helping to perfect the dolphin kick technique.

CompuDude
07-24-2007, 18:47
dolphin kick is where your ankles stay close together and your two legs move as one to propel yourself forward. it's less of a 'leg' motion and more of a whole body motion.

when i was learning butterfly, i was told that you can imagine moving your chest up and down vertically in the water. by doing this, your hips and legs will follow almost like an underwater snaking motion. clearly, the name comes from the dolphin, and in fact, the dolphin kick is the fastest kick you can do underwater (at least from a pure swimming perspective - scuba gear makes it fairly clumsy at times)

if you've ever seen a monofin (sometimes deep free-divers use these) it basically locks your feet inches apart in the fin's boots, helping to perfect the dolphin kick technique.


Yup, great kick for freedivers, but as you noted scuba gear doesn't allow it to work effectively. That, and it uses a tremendous amount of energy and air to move you... and greatly limits your agility... is why they don't bother to teach it for scuba.