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CamaroChick
12-06-2007, 14:16
I've had trouble on the last two dive trips with the lens area of my Ikelite case fogging up during a dive. One of the DMs suggested putting something called "moisture munchers" in there, but I have not been able to find them.
Any suggestions?

MSilvia
12-06-2007, 14:32
I suggest closing your camera housing in an air conditioned space. If there isn't any moisture in there, it won't condense when the ocean cools it. That said, "moisture munchers" are basicly silica gel packs if I recall correctly.

thor
12-06-2007, 14:32
I have never heard of moisture munchers, but I use those dessicant capsules/bags that come in packaging, vitamins, etc. and they work great, as long as they fit in the housing. The bag variety is much better and fits great. Should be some in somebody's Christmas gifts you can snag

LI Diver
12-06-2007, 14:39
Anybody who sells sealife cameras will have moisture munchers. Ck scubatoys link here scroll down on page.

Dive cameras, underwater photography equipment, scuba cameras (http://www.scubatoys.com/store/Scuba_Cameras.asp)

CamaroChick
12-06-2007, 14:59
awesome - thanks ES601 - I must be blind for not seeing that on ST :o)

CompuDude
12-06-2007, 15:21
Also see: Condensation Problems (http://pt010.da-kine.info/condensation.htm)

And the links on the page lead to sources.

cheebaweebie
12-06-2007, 15:25
I wonder if putting in a box with a can of that Damp Rid would work. That sucks all the moisture out of the air. Put that on my boat in the cabin before and keeps it dry inside... no mold.

dbh
12-06-2007, 16:42
Silica Gel Desiccant and Acid Free Tissue Paper (http://www.preservationstation.com/products.htm#SilicaGelDesiccants)

rach
12-06-2007, 18:22
while we have a sea & see and don't use moisture munchers (and have not had a problem with fog at all, knock on wood), my father-in-law had the HARDEST time with those little things...if, if, IF he could find them prior to the trip (because it's a rare overseas dive shop that will carry them), they would inevitably go bad on the flight to wherever we were diving...I guess I really don't have any suggestions, but instead just a warning of how frustrating those things could be so that you have a little more patience than we did! :smiley36:

CompuDude
12-06-2007, 18:51
while we have a sea & see and don't use moisture munchers (and have not had a problem with fog at all, knock on wood), my father-in-law had the HARDEST time with those little things...if, if, IF he could find them prior to the trip (because it's a rare overseas dive shop that will carry them), they would inevitably go bad on the flight to wherever we were diving...I guess I really don't have any suggestions, but instead just a warning of how frustrating those things could be so that you have a little more patience than we did! :smiley36:

1) Get the higher quality rechargeable types, and even if they turn on the trip over, you just need access to a microwave for a couple of minutes and you're ready to go again.

2) Keep them stored in a small air-tight container, else they'll suck the moisture out of the ambient air, fill up, and be useless when you need them. (without another recharge cycle, that is)

WestTnDiver
12-06-2007, 20:21
I use the Moisture Munchers and keep them in a small jar filled with Damp Rid. This keeps them from absorbing too much moisture in the hotel room.
I also recharge them in the oven a day before the trip. I've used the room light bulb with the MMs on a piece of paper as an emergency recharger before I got an extra set and started using the Damp Rid.

AUTiger
12-19-2007, 00:33
I use the 2g packets from Preservation Station, as mentioned in post #8. I keep the bulk of them in a big plastic cap medicine bottle and about a dozen of them in an old film cannister. They turn from purple to pink as the get used up. To "recharge" them, I put then in the oven at a low temperature, I think something like 200deg F on a baking sheet until they turn purple again.

I have never had a problem with fogging. I think using a small dessicant pack is much easier than dealing with air conditioners or blowing dry air into the housing or any of the other creative things that people suggest.

Just be sure not to catch the dessicant pack in the o-ring seal when you close the housing.

David

rach
12-20-2007, 18:52
while we have a sea & see and don't use moisture munchers (and have not had a problem with fog at all, knock on wood), my father-in-law had the HARDEST time with those little things...if, if, IF he could find them prior to the trip (because it's a rare overseas dive shop that will carry them), they would inevitably go bad on the flight to wherever we were diving...I guess I really don't have any suggestions, but instead just a warning of how frustrating those things could be so that you have a little more patience than we did! :smiley36:

1) Get the higher quality rechargeable types, and even if they turn on the trip over, you just need access to a microwave for a couple of minutes and you're ready to go again.

2) Keep them stored in a small air-tight container, else they'll suck the moisture out of the ambient air, fill up, and be useless when you need them. (without another recharge cycle, that is)


thanks! i'll let him know...i don't think he was sure if he could heat them up or not so he just never did...he's visiting right now and has tremendous success with his camera this week--yay!

CompuDude
12-20-2007, 19:13
Note that recharging only works with the higher-quality ones that have color-change indicators, and hear resistant plastic. If you try to recharge the cheap ones that came packed with your last pair of shoes, it's not necessarily going to work. (think melted plastic bags, etc.)

qualitysiding
12-21-2007, 20:51
I have some I bought in bulk. Not specifically moisture munchers name brand. but a silica gel desiccant in small 1 oz packets. I'll send you some...say 10 for $5. I used two and they fit really nice in my canon housing just under bottom of the camera.

dannybot
01-17-2008, 17:13
I use the silica packs that came with my Olympus housing. They recommend using a new one each dive. I just had my first prolem with condensation, after using the same packet for 40 dives! I store them in the little ziplock bag that they came in.

bversteegh
01-18-2008, 09:38
In a pinch, kitty litter works.

1) crunch the kitty litter (put it in a cloth bag and hit it a few times with a hammer) - this gives you fresh surface area that hasn't absorbed humidity from the air

2)Poke some holes in a small ziplock plastic bag - and pour in your "newly activited" kitty litter desicant

3) Insert in camera

jugglematt
02-11-2008, 04:09
Hi
im not shure if it has been said but , i find keeping your camera out of the sun also very important for reducing fogging.

when you take your camera out for the day put it into a plastic tub , and cover it with a towel , this protects it and keeps it a bit cooler , on the boat make shure your camera doesent sit in the sun. and again cover with a towel .

silica gell is good also, some friend of mine use a Panty Liner cut into strips and put one strip into housing , helps absorb any moisture ,

every now and then completly wipe the inside of your housing with a fresh /new tissue .

hope this helps
Matt