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Krafcheck
12-07-2007, 07:53
Why is there a boat specialty? I have not taken it so maybe I am missing something. Are dive charter boats trying to move forward with the idea of no boat specialty, no diving? Maybe a potential insurance issue with dive charters? Not trying to bash it, I just dont get it. I have notice some LDS's have this in there Level II AOW package and others dont. I know specialties are meant to introduce things, but ....:smilie40:. Probably a meaningless thread since I will be taking my Level II class with the local LDS sometime in 08' that has this in its core package.

Damselfish
12-07-2007, 08:30
Have never heard of a charter that required this specialty. There are a few things to be learned about boat diving, but they are easy enough to pick up without a class. Just read some about it and pay attention to briefings when you're on any boat. A lot of the things are going to be specific to different boats anyway.

I imagine some people teach boat specialties that people get something worthwhile out of, but I would say it is usually a waste of time if it is replacing something potentially more useful. I don't know much about SSI but if this is an optional choice in a Level II class I would say it is filler and you should try and get something "meatier".

NitroWill
12-07-2007, 08:36
I would say that it is mainly just a class to get peoples money..
Could you learn a lot from it? Sure maybe - but I don't think its anything you cant learn from basic books and reading on forums and doing a couple boat dives.

I would say - if you can - choose other specialities such as navigation, night, deep, wreck, or anything else that gives you a new kind of diving experience!

BouzoukiJoe A.K.A. wrecker130 AKA Chuck Norris AKA joeforbroke (banned)
12-07-2007, 08:40
Yes, I believe its been covered before. Use the search, noob! ;-)

Some people who live inland have no exposure to boats. It's entirely possible to log 1000 dives and never have been on a boat. The terminology can be new and confusing. Also, entry and exit techniques are not the same. Given all this, PADI thought it could make some money by hand-holding someone through their first couple of boat experiences.

Personally I think having a course is a bit of a joke. Just go with someone or a group that has been before. My LDS often goes on charters with people who have never been on a boat before so they cover the essentials in the pre-trip meeting.

FWIW, at least one operator on the NC coast wants you to either be with an instructor or have at least one boat dive in your log (among other requirements). I don't think they check the log but make you sign a form attesting to your experience and releasing them from liability, etc.

No Misses
12-07-2007, 09:04
I got the Boat Diver cert as a gimme. All of my checkout dives were boat dives. From what I can remember about the "test", the course is directed at people who know nothing about boating and want to learn a few of the terms and such so that they do not feel like such a noob, the first time that they step on a boat. If you are a diver from Nebraska (no offense intended) your first boat dive might be while you are on vacation.

Bow -Front of boat
Stern - Back of boat
Starboard - Right side of boat
Port - Left Side of boat
Gunwale – top edge of the side of boat
Swim platform – low platform at stern of boat to facilitate entry and exit from the water
Head – toilet

Appropriate water entries (boat exits) Giant Stride off swim platform / back roll off gunwale

Marine head – Nothing goes into the head that did not travel through your body first! Operation of the marine head (dry/wet valve and pump).

Mask rinse bucket vs camera rinse bucket

Don’t bring all of the dive gear that you own. Bring what you need plus a save-a-dive kit.

Proper stowing of gear to make it safer and easier for everybody on the boat

What to do in case of separation from the dive boat

Etc.

Is the certification necessary? It probably is not. But, if you know nothing about boats and you want a crash course prior to your first livaboard or boat dive vacation, go for it. Don’t let a lack of knowledge create any unneeded stress. It is you vacation. You are supposed to be relaxed J

Happy diving!

in_cavediver
12-07-2007, 21:18
I used to think this was worthless, then I met an instructor in pompano. His boat class is quite different. Its kinda a primer to do advanced diving from boats. Its not the fluff about what a boat is, its the nuts and bolts for diving on wrecks

Some of the items he covers:

-Procedures for drift dive
-Locating and hooking wrecks (includes setting the hook and retrieving the hook while doing a drift deco scenario)
-Procedures for tying into buoys
-Procedures for Live boat diving
-Currents and waves (how to minimize)
-emergency procedures (getting diver onboard)
-emergency procedures (treating diver onboard)
-emergency procedures (helicopter transfer)
-emergency procedures (no-boat)
-emergency procedures (blue water ascent)
-emergency procedures (lift bag/surface signaling)
plus more I can't recall off the top of my head.

Its not really a gimmie class and is targeted more to those who plan to dive from private boats, tec boats and 6-packs. IE, not cattle boats or DM led boats.

CaptainRon
12-07-2007, 21:39
Some people who live inland have no exposure to boats. It's entirely possible to log 1000 dives and never have been on a boat. The terminology can be new and confusing. Also, entry and exit techniques are not the same.

I can attest to that. I have been diving for the last 28 years and have never done a boat dive. All my diving has been inland lakes and rivers. Did my first saltwater dive last year in Grand Cayman and even that was a shore dive. Well, I'm going to do my first boat dive in Cozumel next month. By reading this board, I think I have a pretty good idea of what to expect.

Ohmdiver
12-07-2007, 22:15
FWIW, I live in upstate ny were we dive the finger lakes mostly, an IN land lake, all the good sites are acesses by boat. Most shore dives can not be done in state parks between Memorial day and labor day, and most of the land is privately owned.
I think it is an over priced course, but it gets people thinking about what you are doing on a boat with your gear, and to think about other people. Maybe this "specialty" should be part of the Basic Open Water course. I can not tell you the number of times we get some one on a boat that thinks they have exclusive rights to half the boat. Manners seem to not exisit.

FroggDVR
12-07-2007, 22:25
Once again this is something that depends on the instructor.
It could be a worthwhile specialty. How often do you plan on diving from a boat? not just a cattle boat but a 6-pack or private boat.

I have been on many charters where the captain has asked for help in hooking the mooring, tying to the dock, even taking the helm while he tended to another diver. So it would help to know port from starboard, bow or stern. How about knots?? Sure you can tie em, but can you do it one handed while holding on to a bow rail.
All of these little things can be asked of you on a 6-pack here in the Great Lakes

aeropl
12-07-2007, 23:42
It sounds like the specialty will only be worth it if you've never been on a boat before. For some people that's true so now they have the option to learn first.

navyhmc
12-08-2007, 05:29
And...don't forget in rolling seas, make your entry and get away from the boat. It hurts a whole lot if the hull hits you!!!

BTW: "6-packs"?????

DivingCRNA
12-08-2007, 07:29
:shhh:

I have boat. I think I got it for cheap when a bunch of others were doing it in Cozumel. I figured I would get it in case I ever became a specialty instructor, or something like that.

I did not learn much because I had been on 2 one week long live aboards...

Splitlip
12-08-2007, 07:49
BTW: "6-packs"?????

6 or fewer passengers. Less restrictive Coast Guard requirements for the master of the vessel.

DivingCRNA
12-08-2007, 08:02
And...don't forget in rolling seas, make your entry and get away from the boat. It hurts a whole lot if the hull hits you!!!

BTW: "6-packs"?????

You know... Beer comes in 30 packs, 24 packs, 12 packs, and 6 PACKS :smilie39::smilie39::smilie39::smiley2:

Zenagirl
12-08-2007, 08:09
I've been on FAR too many boat charters with folks who haven't a clue about how to dive from a boat that I don't think the "specialty" is such a joke anymore.

My favorite was this big fat guy (300+ pounds) who bragged the entire way out to the site that he had over 500 dives and was the best diver on earth. He proceeded to rinse (and leave) his mask in the camera rinse bucket, spread his crap out all over the deck, took up 3 spaces on the bench with his junk, left his wetsuit in a heap on the deck, talked during the briefing, stood at the ladder to adjust all of his gear and attempt to put on his fins for a good 5 minutes before splashing in, upon return to the boat waited UNDER the ladder while 2 other folks climbed on board then proceeded to take his fins off and try to climb the ladder (contrary to the boat briefing), then stood in front of the ladder to take more gear off preventing anyone else from boarding the boat, and the final insult....put toilet paper into the head and clogged it but didn't inform the crew of the mess.

He was a nightmare and all I can say is that I was glad to have my setup on the other side of the boat and not to have been in his dive group.

For many of us, a boat diving specialty isn't necessary, but for guys like this it should be a REQUIREMENT!!

ReefHound
12-08-2007, 08:48
I used to think this was worthless, then I met an instructor in pompano. His boat class is quite different. Its kinda a primer to do advanced diving from boats. Its not the fluff about what a boat is, its the nuts and bolts for diving on wrecks

Some of the items he covers:...

I think the typical PADI Boat specialty is mostly for card collectors and people who do not like to learn new things independently, but I would sign up for the course you described in a heartbeat.

WV Diver
12-08-2007, 08:55
I've been on FAR too many boat charters with folks who haven't a clue about how to dive from a boat that I don't think the "specialty" is such a joke anymore.

My favorite was this big fat guy (300+ pounds) who bragged the entire way out to the site that he had over 500 dives and was the best diver on earth. He proceeded to rinse (and leave) his mask in the camera rinse bucket, spread his crap out all over the deck, took up 3 spaces on the bench with his junk, left his wetsuit in a heap on the deck, talked during the briefing, stood at the ladder to adjust all of his gear and attempt to put on his fins for a good 5 minutes before splashing in, upon return to the boat waited UNDER the ladder while 2 other folks climbed on board then proceeded to take his fins off and try to climb the ladder (contrary to the boat briefing), then stood in front of the ladder to take more gear off preventing anyone else from boarding the boat, and the final insult....put toilet paper into the head and clogged it but didn't inform the crew of the mess.

He was a nightmare and all I can say is that I was glad to have my setup on the other side of the boat and not to have been in his dive group.

For many of us, a boat diving specialty isn't necessary, but for guys like this it should be a REQUIREMENT!!

LOL. I have seen this guy before and he really is a mess. You describe him very well. This self proclaimed super hero of diving and those like him would probably only take a small fraction of a boat specialty course to heart or even hear it over their constant bragging over their abilities and spinning of yarns that highlight their expert skills.

dannybot
12-08-2007, 08:56
If you have the PADI adventures in diving manual from AOW, read the chapter, it tells you all you really need to know, the operators tend to be vary helpful in filling in the gaps.

Splitlip
12-08-2007, 09:21
He proceeded to rinse (and leave) his mask in the camera rinse bucket, spread his crap out all over the deck, took up 3 spaces on the bench with his junk, left his wetsuit in a heap on the deck, talked during the briefing, stood at the ladder to adjust all of his gear and attempt to put on his fins for a good 5 minutes before splashing in, upon return to the boat waited UNDER the ladder while 2 other folks climbed on board then proceeded to take his fins off and try to climb the ladder (contrary to the boat briefing), then stood in front of the ladder to take more gear off preventing anyone else from boarding the boat, and the final insult....put toilet paper into the head and clogged it but didn't inform the crew of the mess.

I know him as well. I think his name is Richard something or other because people were always saying "Look at that, Dick." Or maybe it was "Look at that dick".