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PubDartGuy
12-08-2007, 12:37
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/52/Reef_Triggerfish_1.JPG/200px-Reef_Triggerfish_1.JPG
I've heard several divers say that they don't see as many Humuhumunukunukuāpua`a (reef triggerfish) while diving off Hawai'i as they used to see. Being the official "state fish" of Hawai'i, are they protected by law? Does anyone know if the Humuhumu population is officially in decline, or threatened?

And on a side note, what do folks think about the High School Musical 2 soundtrack's song? ( YouTube - Humuhumunukunukuapua'a - FULL SONG (http://youtube.com/watch?v=7kg2LMh4aFY) ) Is their pronunciation correct at least? :smiley2:

Navy OnStar
12-08-2007, 12:41
I don't know if HSM2's pronounciation is correct but I KNOW when my daughter sings the song over and over and over and over, she's no where close!:smilie39:

divingchef
12-08-2007, 12:49
I lived in Kona for some time and spent most of my time shore fishing "slide-bait" style which involves catching small small to use as live bait from the rocks....some day I couldn´t get anything to bite but the triggers....maybe near urban areas there is a prob, but in Kona they appear to be thriving....

RoadRacer1978
12-08-2007, 12:54
Don't know if it is correct, but here is the pronuncination I found when doing a seach.
Humuhumunukunukuāpua'a - (who-moo-who-moo-new-coo-new-coo-ah-poo-ah ah) The Hawaiian state fish

Interesting that the legislation on Humuhumunukunukuāpua`a making it the sate fish ran out in 1990 and was not reinstated until 2006 as the state fish again. During my search I did not find any info as to whether the population is getting any smaller though.

PubDartGuy
12-08-2007, 13:03
I don't know if HSM2's pronounciation is correct but I KNOW when my daughter sings the song over and over and over and over, she's no where close!:smilie39:
ROFLOL! I know >exactly< what you mean, as my daughter does the same! It's very cute of course - at least when she sings it. I just come off as goofy!

She cannot wait to see the Humuhumu song/dance on the DVD when it comes out.

Zenagirl
12-08-2007, 20:04
ROFLOL!! The pronunciation is correct, and I don't know that they are dying out, we seem to see them all the time when we're diving Maui and we go annually (2 weeks away!!).

WV Diver
12-09-2007, 08:21
I didn't even realize that this was the state fish. I hope to see one when I come to visit in 09. Anyone have a link to a picture of it?

RoadRacer1978
12-09-2007, 08:36
Same one from the op, just bigger.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/52/Reef_Triggerfish_1.JPG

WV Diver
12-09-2007, 09:42
I think the name means "fish with a pig's nose".

RoadRacer1978
12-09-2007, 10:00
You got it correct. Quote from Wikipedia


Humuhumunukunukuapuaʻa means "triggerfish with a pig-like short snout".

The reef, rectangular, wedge-tail, or Picasso triggerfish, also known by its Scuba Gear and Scuba Diving Equipment - Discount dive gear (http://Hawaiian) name, humu­humu­nuku­nuku­āpua`a (Scuba Gear and Scuba Diving Equipment - Discount dive gear (http://IPA): [ˌhumuˌhumuˌnukuˌnukuˌa:puˈaʔa], also spelled Humuhumunukunukuapua'a or just humuhumu for short; meaning "triggerfish with a snout like a pig"[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reef_triggerfish#_note-0)), is one of several species (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Species) of triggerfish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triggerfish). Classified as Rhinecanthus rectangulus, it is endemic to the salt water coasts of various central and south Pacific Ocean (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Ocean) islands. It is often asserted that the Hawaiian name is one of the longest words in the English Language (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longest_word_in_English#Major_dictionaries) and that "the name is longer than the fish."

scubajane
01-14-2008, 18:43
Same one from the op, just bigger.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/52/Reef_Triggerfish_1.JPG
looks like a STEELER fish to me:smiley20:

Kokomo
01-14-2008, 18:53
Hope I see one when I go to Hawaii.

moosicman
01-14-2008, 19:13
You got it correct. Quote from Wikipedia


Humuhumunukunukuapuaʻa means "triggerfish with a pig-like short snout".

The reef, rectangular, wedge-tail, or Picasso triggerfish, also known by its Scuba Gear and Scuba Diving Equipment - Discount dive gear (http://Hawaiian) name, humu­humu­nuku­nuku­āpua`a (Scuba Gear and Scuba Diving Equipment - Discount dive gear (http://IPA): [ˌhumuˌhumuˌnukuˌnukuˌa:puˈaʔa], also spelled Humuhumunukunukuapua'a or just humuhumu for short; meaning "triggerfish with a snout like a pig"[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reef_triggerfish#_note-0)), is one of several species (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Species) of triggerfish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triggerfish). Classified as Rhinecanthus rectangulus, it is endemic to the salt water coasts of various central and south Pacific Ocean (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Ocean) islands. It is often asserted that the Hawaiian name is one of the longest words in the English Language (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longest_word_in_English#Major_dictionaries) and that "the name is longer than the fish."



You are both wrong......it means "fish" :smilie39::smilie39::smilie39:

whse56
01-14-2008, 20:09
Definetly a neat looking fish

Rick56
01-14-2008, 21:57
I was interested in this thread because my family was in Hawaii last summer and we saw several of these beautiful fish, so I did some checking around. According to Hoover’s “Hawaii’s fishes,” humuhumu-nukunuku-ä-pua’a means “nose like a pig.” Not only that, it grunts like a pig when pulled from the water.

The scientific name is Rhinecanthus rectangulus, and another common name is, “reef triggerfish.” It is not a Federally-listed species (i.e., it is not threatened or endangered), and it doesn’t appear that there are any other special status determinations.

However, all may not be well--the abundance could decline dramatically before a species is listed. I can’t point to any scientific evidence, but I left Hawaii with the sense that the condition of the reefs were at risk. If the reefs are in decline, chances are that the native fish are too.

The "Hawaiian language map" that my daughter bought at Volcanoes National Park, gives the pronunciation as, "hoo-moo-hoo-moo-noo-koo-noo-koo-wäh-poo-wah'ah." Although I can't vouch for the accuracy of the language map, it seems to me that the song may be right on, but I'd sure like to know what a native Hawaiian would say.

Zenagirl
01-15-2008, 07:36
If you want to practically be guaranteed a sighting of a Hummu, go snorkel or dive at Black Rock on Maui. We saw at least 6 of them before we even got out to the end of the rock formation.

thecheeseman
03-07-2008, 15:46
In '05 I went snorkeling. Saw TONS of them. Summer of '07, I went to the same beach. WAYYYY less. I was really surprised, i saw mabye 1/3 of the ones I saw in'05.

PubDartGuy
03-08-2008, 07:22
Since I posted this question, I went on vacation to Hawaii for a week. We did 5 dives and 2 snorkeling trips, and I only saw maybe 10 or 15 Humus combined. Since that was my first trip, I don't have a basis of comparison other than stories from others that I've heard and read. But it seems like there are not as many Humus as there once were...

I haven't yet found any studies or official projects looking into this. However there is some very interesting (and disturbing) reading about what is going on in the world's oceans at the Project AWARE Foundations' "Hot Issues" website:
Project AWARE (http://www.projectaware.org/americas/english/hi.asp)

thecheeseman
03-08-2008, 10:03
thanks for that link man! wow that is insane. I was diving in Monterey, CA and saw SOOOO much trash. It was SAD. :(