PDA

View Full Version : Reg Necklaces - Dangerous?



PsychDiver
12-18-2007, 07:06
I know that reg necklaces are not real common in recreational diving and appear to be a good idea for securing a reg, but has anyone heard of problems with having something wrapped around your neck underwater?

NitroWill
12-18-2007, 07:43
I don't think it presents much of a problem. You can pull the necklaces and they will stretch considerably to easily take them off. They are also fairly easy to cut thru. If anything gets close enough to touch the necklace its going to hit you in the head first.

mm_dm
12-18-2007, 07:46
No, I haven't. I have the reg neclace and the long hose wrapped, so you would think I've got plenty of rope to hang myself, but it hasn't been a problem. I used to have occassional problems with my conventional length hose getting snagged in poor viz. The only other entanglements involved line wandering onto my first stage from behind. Since I bungie the alternate and wrap the primary neither I or my friends who do the same have had it cause a problem. Hope this helps.

BSea
12-18-2007, 08:31
I know that reg necklaces are not real common in recreational diving and appear to be a good idea for securing a reg, but has anyone heard of problems with having something wrapped around your neck underwater?I would think that the hoses looping above your head attached to a valve behind your head would be more of a hazard. Now I don't dive a long hose (not yet anyway), but I do use a bungied safe 2nd with the hose run under my arm. I haven't found anything that I even remotely like as well.

ianr33
12-18-2007, 10:10
Its annoying when you get out of your gear,stand up and get pulled back down again by the necklaced reg that you forgot about!

If you are in the habit of taking off your gear underwater it is something else to remember.

I would not dive any other way,it just makes sense to me.

texdiveguy
12-18-2007, 10:24
I know that reg necklaces are not real common in recreational diving and appear to be a good idea for securing a reg, but has anyone heard of problems with having something wrapped around your neck underwater?

Not a safety issue at all if rigged properly.

My secondary short hosed 2nd. stage is on a necklace....there are 'several ways' to rig these...I use a method of a simple length of surgical tubing and it is attached to the 2nd. stage via a zip tie....also remember that if it becomes an endangerment, a real good tug and the tubing pulls out from the zip tie and it free from around your neck. The other precaution we take is to not letting the necklace be way to long.

:)

MSilvia
12-18-2007, 10:45
has anyone heard of problems with having something wrapped around your neck underwater?
I've seen several problems with people having monster octopus tentacles and stuff like that wrapped around their neck underwater, but only in the movies. I've never heard of a bungied reg necklace being an issue... except as previously mentioned when someone forgets to remove the necklace first when getting out of their gear. Even then, it's a very minor inconvenience that at worst might make you look silly.

Z-naught
12-18-2007, 12:59
I know that reg necklaces are not real common in recreational diving and appear to be a good idea for securing a reg, but has anyone heard of problems with having something wrapped around your neck underwater?I suppose if you were planning on engaging in serious hand-to-hand combat underwater, then anything looping around your neck could be potentially used as a strangulation device, hypothetically. So, word to the wise, when trying to kill another diver with your bare hands, keep your hoses away from your neck and don't wear a necklace. However, when not trying to kill other divers with your bare hands, using a long hose primary and short hose backup on a necklace is, in my opinion, the safest way to dive.

If interested in a regulator necklace, I suggest you check out Manta's (http://mantaind.com/accessories/regulator_necklace.htm). They're made of nice, thick silicone in five colours and two sizes.

CompuDude
12-18-2007, 13:10
Not dangerous at all. And far more streamlined.

As NitroWill pointed out, it's designed to pull free quite easily if needed, and cuts very simply as well.

The only "problem" I've ever heard of is, as noted above, people forgetting to take them off when removing their gear. Then it's mostly a yank before it releases, and some embarrassment if anyone saw!

mwhities
12-18-2007, 13:14
I only have one-arm and this setup is ideal for myself. I know where my backup is at all times. I even have it so I can drop my primary and pickup my secondary without the use of my hand. (Still practicing though.).

Matt P
12-18-2007, 17:49
One other thing to consider is that a free-flow on the necklaced octo could cause visibility problems with the bubbles flowing directly into your field of vision. In that case you'd want to be able to remove the necklace or dislodge the octo from the necklace.

PsychDiver
12-18-2007, 18:24
Thanks for the feedback. Intuitively it looks like a smart idea. With this positive feedback I think I will give it a try and see how I like it.

Specmac
12-18-2007, 19:32
[quote]So, word to the wise, when trying to kill another diver with your bare hands, keep your hoses away from your neck and don't wear a necklace.

:smilie39:

MSilvia
12-19-2007, 08:13
If interested in a regulator necklace, I suggest you check out Manta's (http://mantaind.com/accessories/regulator_necklace.htm). They're made of nice, thick silicone in five colours and two sizes.
I suggest you make your own. I was given a manta necklace for free at Sea Rovers. After trying it out on a dive, I laughed and almost threw it out before deciding to eBay it. What a flimsy piece of junk... it wouldn't hold the reg tightly enough to secure it, so it kept falling out.

NitroWill
12-19-2007, 08:22
Was it really a Manta? There are some imitations that arent great - but Ive used my manta for a long while and it has just the right amount of hold on my octo.



If interested in a regulator necklace, I suggest you check out Manta's (http://mantaind.com/accessories/regulator_necklace.htm). They're made of nice, thick silicone in five colours and two sizes.
I suggest you make your own. I was given a manta necklace for free at Sea Rovers. After trying it out on a dive, I laughed and almost threw it out before deciding to eBay it. What a flimsy piece of junk... it wouldn't hold the reg tightly enough to secure it, so it kept falling out.

BSea
12-19-2007, 08:53
Was it really a Manta? There are some imitations that arent great - but Ive used my manta for a long while and it has just the right amount of hold on my octo.



If interested in a regulator necklace, I suggest you check out Manta's (http://mantaind.com/accessories/regulator_necklace.htm). They're made of nice, thick silicone in five colours and two sizes.
I suggest you make your own. I was given a manta necklace for free at Sea Rovers. After trying it out on a dive, I laughed and almost threw it out before deciding to eBay it. What a flimsy piece of junk... it wouldn't hold the reg tightly enough to secure it, so it kept falling out.
Some mouthpieces are smaller than others. I've heard other stories of Manta's not holding securely. Was it the mouthpiece size, or the Manta itself? I don't know. But a bungied octo can be set for any size mouthpiece. I doesn't matter if you have the adjustable loop kind like I use, or the ones that are zip tied to the mouthpiece. They are truly "1size fits all".

awap
12-19-2007, 09:13
I usually use fairly light and stretchy bungie for my necklace and, when pull comes to tug, the loop around the mouthpiece will usually let go if yanked hard enough. But doffing your gear in the water takes a bit of planning. I reove the bungie from around my neck and switch to the alt. I clip off the primary so it does not get dragged around as the boathand hauls the rig up.

PsychDiver
12-19-2007, 09:53
Anyone have a pic of their bungie setup?

MSilvia
12-19-2007, 11:06
Was it really a Manta?
Yes.

Was it the mouthpiece size, or the Manta itself? I have a pretty big mouthpiece, but the "jelly" necklace just didn't hold nearly as well as my DIY.

I'll try to remember to post a pic, but basicly it's just a fisherman's knot tied in a bungie cord, with a reg mouthpiece between the two half hitches. I use zip ties to secure the loose ends once it's sized. It looks pretty much just like BSea's though.

BSea
12-19-2007, 12:00
Anyone have a pic of their bungie setup?Here's a picture of mine.

CompuDude
12-19-2007, 13:04
Anyone have a pic of their bungie setup?

Same as Bsea's, but here it is installed. Loose ends not yet trimmed. 3' of 3/16" bungie (some prefer the 1/8" stuff, I don't) costs about $1.50 if you buy by the foot, or pennies if you buy a whole spool.

http://www.h2ogeek.com/divegear/dir/Thumb_IMG_0232.JPGhttp://www.h2ogeek.com/divegear/dir/Thumb_IMG_0233.JPG

cummings66
12-19-2007, 13:08
I'd give you a picture of mine but it's like theirs. I used to have Red Bungie cord on it but now it's black. I think you might see it in my avatar, although that picture was taken as I started getting out of my rig, had to quickly toss it back on for the photo.

PsychDiver
12-20-2007, 08:30
Thanks for the pics. Makes it easy to rig my own.

davepoff
12-23-2007, 22:22
I use the Manta with my Dive Rite regs and they fit fine.

mitch
01-30-2008, 09:59
Anyone have a pic of their bungie setup?

Hi PsychDiver,

Here's my necklace made of surgical tubing that i made about 14 years ago. several years back when my friends switch to bungies, i made a mental note to replace mine with bungie since cracks were forming on the tubing. somehow i never got to do it and i still use the #*%! thing!

http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj40/mitchfilart/necklace1.jpg

see the cracks, i'll replace it as soon as it breaks, that's a promise!
http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj40/mitchfilart/neclace2.jpg

in_cavediver
01-30-2008, 11:27
Anyone have a pic of their bungie setup?

Hi PsychDiver,

Here's my necklace made of surgical tubing that i made about 14 years ago. several years back when my friends switch to bungies, i made a mental note to replace mine with bungie since cracks were forming on the tubing. somehow i never got to do it and i still use the #*%! thing!

http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj40/mitchfilart/necklace1.jpg

see the cracks, i'll replace it as soon as it breaks, that's a promise!
http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj40/mitchfilart/neclace2.jpg

Mine looks the same way. I prefer the surgical tubing with 2 cable ties per side as if something really gets caught, it will pull apart underwater where the bungie won't. OK, maybe its more that I am too lazy to make a new one since I have had the surgical tubing version 7 years and it cost about 3 bucks to make and I've had zero problems with it.

cummings66
01-30-2008, 12:31
I still kind of like the bungee with the fishermans knot which would release the regulator if it had to. That's how I've got mine at any rate and it's easy to do. Those zip ties break, I lost something last weekend because I used zipties to hold it. Who knew in 5 degree temps those things turned brittle...

WaScubaDude
01-30-2008, 16:20
I heard of a diver (maybe on this forum) who fell back into the water with mask on neck and was not able to access the octo on the necklace.
One more tid bit to chew on.

ReefHound
01-30-2008, 18:19
I heard of a diver (maybe on this forum) who fell back into the water with mask on neck and was not able to access the octo on the necklace.
One more tid bit to chew on.

Would he have been able to access it somewhere else? Why couldn't he access his primary?

Crimediver
01-30-2008, 19:05
I heard of a diver (maybe on this forum) who fell back into the water with mask on neck and was not able to access the octo on the necklace.
One more tid bit to chew on.
One more good reason to wear your mask on the forehead (MOF) !:smiley31:

cummings66
01-30-2008, 19:14
I'm not sure how many times I'll have to answer this one because I was the one who had the issue a ways back. WaScubaDude likes to refer to my near drowning as to why you need ditchable weight and now no backups.

When I got knocked into the water I had my fins off, mask around neck with the glass facing forwards, no weight belt, just a tank and BC and the primary wasn't clipped off. I was in the process of degearing when I was knocked in, and I was negative to boot at the time due to the amount of air in the tank. It was a steel tank and a BP/W.

So, the primary was floating way over there and if it's free flowing it's not exactly an easy target to find blind. Picture it being up above and behind flopping around and the armsweep fails to find it. You're blind because of no mask, 40 degree water that's green as can be.

At any rate the armsweeps didn't find it until later on.

Look at my avatar, that is how I left the water maybe a month ago when I was diving Bennett Springs. Do you notice the mask is now strap to the front? Do you know why? It's because I can access the backup with it that way and can't the other. If you have an experience like that you learn from it and hopefully modify what caused the problem. The mask strap is the white under my chin or what looks like a slice of something.

Could I have accessed the backup if it was in the triangle? Yes, almost certainly. Could I have accessed it with my mask on backwards, yes again.

For WaScubaDude, could I have dumped weights and become buoyant? Just pulling your leg man, look at my weight belt I have on now. See that lead brick by my left hand, there's also a duplicate on the right on the belt.

To make WaScubaDude happy I tossed on a belt so I could ditch it, I'll still be negative but heck, I can ditch can't I? Again, just pulling your leg. I know your thoughts and you know mine.

There's the explanation as to why I couldn't use the backup and took a few sweeps to find the primary, and yes, I did think at the time I was going to bite the big one.

UCFKnightDiver
01-30-2008, 20:02
I heard of a diver (maybe on this forum) who fell back into the water with mask on neck and was not able to access the octo on the necklace.
One more tid bit to chew on.
One more good reason to wear your mask on the forehead (MOF) !:smiley31:


i like it crimediver lol I am a MOF kinda guy

Crimediver
01-30-2008, 22:32
I heard of a diver (maybe on this forum) who fell back into the water with mask on neck and was not able to access the octo on the necklace.
One more tid bit to chew on.
One more good reason to wear your mask on the forehead (MOF) !:smiley31:


i like it crimediver lol I am a MOF kinda guy
Well good for you. FWIW I have been diving for over 40 years and still own every mask I've had. Never lost one yet. If it was good enough for Mike Nelson, then it's good enough for me. Everyone knows me well enough to know that if I need help when I come up I will pop a flare or holler, not put my mask on my forehead....

WaScubaDude
01-30-2008, 22:58
I'm not sure how many times I'll have to answer this one because I was the one who had the issue a ways back. WaScubaDude likes to refer to my near drowning as to why you need ditchable weight and now no backups. Snip...

For WaScubaDude, could I have dumped weights and become buoyant? Just pulling your leg man, look at my weight belt I have on now. See that lead brick by my left hand, there's also a duplicate on the right on the belt.

To make WaScubaDude happy I tossed on a belt so I could ditch it, I'll still be negative but heck, I can ditch can't I? Again, just pulling your leg. I know your thoughts and you know mine.

There's the explanation as to why I couldn't use the backup and took a few sweeps to find the primary, and yes, I did think at the time I was going to bite the big one.

Thanks for being good humored about it. I am glad you made it thru it. Perhaps others will learn from your experience, I know I have.
Oh and next time I will just write "Ask Matt about his near death story" lol


Still working on my gear config, tried the Manta necklace and will try one of my own making that is a bit longer. Also thinking of a teather or a reliable way to clip-off the mask when not in use??

cummings66
01-31-2008, 10:25
I've used a double ender to clip the mask off with, I guarantee you I will NEVER hang it around my neck facing forwards. I was never told it could be dangerous with that gear config. In fact I surprised a lot of friends when I had that issue, it was a good learning experience and thankfully I made it through.

mitch
01-31-2008, 11:32
I heard of a diver (maybe on this forum) who fell back into the water with mask on neck and was not able to access the octo on the necklace.
One more tid bit to chew on.

well if i ever fall back into the water with my mask around my neck (which is where it usually is when i surface) and i somehow could not get the necklaced reg into my mouth when i'm in the water, well then i just breath the sweet air at the surface when my head pops out as i'd surely be positively bouyant, in any wierd instance that i sink to the abyss straight down, well, just snap off the clipped 2nd sage and suck on that reg. thanks for the tid bit to chew on :smiley9:

Gombessa
01-31-2008, 11:59
At the surface or before doffing on a boat, I like to have my mask on my forehead, backwards so the strap is facing forward.

mitch
01-31-2008, 12:09
At the surface or before doffing on a boat, I like to have my mask on my forehead, backwards so the strap is facing forward.

that's the best way to lose your mask in choppy water, while waiting for a chase boat to pick you up....but once on the boat there's no better way to stow it, glass behind your head, strap on your forehead. And don't forget to rinse it with a little bottled drinking water afterward so dried salt/mineral doesnt form on the glass (duh!)

Gombessa
01-31-2008, 12:15
At the surface or before doffing on a boat, I like to have my mask on my forehead, backwards so the strap is facing forward.

that's the best way to lose your mask in choppy water, while waiting for a chase boat to pick you up

Is it any worse than having it glass-forward on your forehead? I try not to go out when the water's that bad, so hopefully I'll never find out firsthand.:smiley11:

mitch
01-31-2008, 12:29
At the surface or before doffing on a boat, I like to have my mask on my forehead, backwards so the strap is facing forward.

that's the best way to lose your mask in choppy water, while waiting for a chase boat to pick you up

Is it any worse than having it glass-forward on your forehead? I try not to go out when the water's that bad, so hopefully I'll never find out firsthand.:smiley11:

i think it doesnt really matter if the glass is back or front, what i meant was when you surface and its kind of rough, the best way not to lose it would be to secure it under your chin by snapping it downwards in one motion... then again its a matter of experience and preferences. no big deal really :smiley20:

marchand
01-31-2008, 13:19
I just leave my mask on until I get on the boat and seated.

cummings66
01-31-2008, 22:20
Mitch, depending on the gear config you have you can easily be negative for the entire dive from start to end. If you are negative at the end of a dive and you have no fins and no ditchable weight, and...

Want an example, try a deco dive with doubles. You're supposed to come up with enough gas to do an extended deco stop on your backgas in case you lose the deco gas. That means you are pretty negative at the end of a dive.

Don't be so quick to dismiss the fact that you will never be negative at the end of a dive, it's not always something you have happen.

Another example would be steel tanks and you abort a dive, now you're negative at the end.

What you didn't get because you weren't here at the beginning of the board is that was a shore dive, the location of removing gear was on a shelf. It's a common area and method of removing gear due to the rocks, you take it off and toss what you can to shore leaving the tank on your back to carefully walk back.

In that post I pointed out the numerous issues surrounding the event, even the fact that the instructors teaching there did the exact same thing I did, only they never got unlucky enough to get knocked back in the water as I did.

I made the assumptions as you did, and they nearly killed me. If you believe it will never happen to you, fine. If you always believe you will always be positive at the end of a dive fine.

What I was saying, and what WaScubaDude was getting at is that things happen and that maybe we can make a little change to prevent an accident. Why is it so important to keep the mask facing forwards at the end of a dive? Why can't we do it like I now do which is I pull it down around my neck, but it's facing backwards. As I said, look at my Avatar, the mask is down around my neck, it can not be pulled off and I will never lose it there, and I can access my backup if needed in that condition.

Tell me this, what is wrong with doing it that way?

Gombessa
01-31-2008, 22:39
Tell me this, what is wrong with doing it that way?

Matthew, there's nothing wrong with wearing your mask around your neck, forward, backward, sideways, whatever. People do it different ways, but you know what they say - different strokes! (no pun intended)

texdiveguy
01-31-2008, 23:01
I know that reg necklaces are not real common in recreational diving and appear to be a good idea for securing a reg, but has anyone heard of problems with having something wrapped around your neck underwater?

I have never seen a regulator necklace get 'wrapped' around someones neck-never!

There are several ways to prep a necklace for securing the alt. second stage around the neck. I choose a simple-cheap and safe method....a piece of surgical tubing and a zip tie. The zip tie is secured around the mouthpiece of the second stage with the ends on the tubing being secured under the zip tie....its easy and safe. :)

mitch
01-31-2008, 23:42
Tell me this, what is wrong with doing it that way?

Matthew, there's nothing wrong with wearing your mask around your neck, forward, backward, sideways, whatever. People do it different ways, but you know what they say - different strokes! (no pun intended)

well said gombessa...just dont fall backwards ever again matthew. be careful man! :smiley36:

cummings66
02-01-2008, 08:45
Have you ever tried to access the backup with the mask down around your neck? Put it on, close your eyes, now try it and to make it realistic make sure that you need to breathe immediately, ie wait until you have to take a breath before you try.

How did it work for you?

I think depending on the length of the bungee it could be easy or hard.

ReefHound
02-01-2008, 10:29
I'll have to try that sometime because it's hard to envision. I don't see a problem with mask behind head but I think I would focus my planning on how to ensure I am positive at the surface rather than how to deal with being knocked into the water while negative. The first thing I do upon surfacing is become positive by adding air to my wing.

You can prepare ad finitum and there will always be a scenario that your planning didn't cover. What if you get knocked over halfway in the process of removing your rig?

cummings66
02-02-2008, 08:35
The issue should be simple to picture. Your necklace is so big, it's a circle with the reg at the middle of it. Your mask is on top of it, nice BIG piece of glass. To get access to your backup with the mask on TOP of it, and COVERING it means you have to pull the backup forwards, over the top of the mask and then UP to your mouth. If the backup is situated so that it's not riding low on your neck, ie it's in close to the neck below the chin, ie it's not snug to the neck nor is it loose, but it's not touching your zyphoid process, then you'll find that you're stretching that bungee material very very tight to get it out up and over. I think with training and an awareness of it you could easily get it to your mouth. If you never realized it would be an issue you could have problems.

I could now slip it UNDER my mask or put my mask back on and get to it in the same conditions because I now know it will be hard the other way. Just keep in mind that at that time I had exhaled my breath and was in the process of inhaling when I got knocked in, so my first thought was to breathe and inflate the wing who's inflator was trapped due to the fact that I was knocked in all askew.

cummings66
02-02-2008, 08:40
By the way, in my original post I identifed several elements together that added up to cause this. The SOP of coming out of the water with a nearly empty wing was a bad idea, I now also inflate it when I hit the surface just like I would on a boat dive.

Many things went wrong that day on that dive for me. Little things that any single one would not present a problem, but when they all happened at once it caused a BIG problem. Sloppiness nearly got me and I have learned a good lesson from it. Don't let one thing go by no matter how minor it seems. One day it can bite you.

ReefHound
02-02-2008, 09:08
The issue should be simple to picture. Your necklace is so big, it's a circle with the reg at the middle of it. Your mask is on top of it, nice BIG piece of glass. To get access to your backup with the mask on TOP of it, and COVERING it means you have to pull the backup forwards, over the top of the mask and then UP to your mouth. If the backup is situated so that it's not riding low on your neck, ie it's in close to the neck below the chin, ie it's not snug to the neck nor is it loose, but it's not touching your zyphoid process, then you'll find that you're stretching that bungee material very very tight to get it out up and over.

Ah, so your necklace has no breakaway option? I use a manta necklace and there would be no stretching to it. Simply reach under close to chest and pull on the second stage (or the attached hose not covered by the mask), octo comes easily out of the loop and is free.

I never liked the mask hanging below my mouth anyway, never was comfortable for me. I'm glad it turned out OK for you. Most accidents are a combination of factors.

mobeeno
04-19-2008, 11:40
I know that reg necklaces are not real common in recreational diving and appear to be a good idea for securing a reg, but has anyone heard of problems with having something wrapped around your neck underwater?
That is the right way to dive.:smiley2: