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Mycroft
01-15-2008, 10:19
Having too many items to handle can be a problem for some divers, so here is a thread on how to use some simple tricks to reduce the task loading.

I first encountered a problem when diving Paradise Springs, trying to handle my inflator, my light, my camera, and my console computer - all with the same hand!

The first suggestion came from my dive buddy of that day. I changed out my lights and now have some that mount to the strobe arm(s) of my camera! Ikelite makes some such lights/brackets, and I have found this to be a great change. (I sold the original light I had).

The next thing I finally did was to swap out my console computer for a wrist mount AI computer (Aladin Air Z O2). This stops me from having to grab for the computer console.

In more recent weeks, I have also rigged up the ability to alternately mount my dive light(s) to my scooter. Same lights, I just ordered 2 more brackets from Ikelite.

I got a simple loopback strap (clicks back into itself) for strapping my fins to my BC while walking into the water.

So, what changes have you made to your gear to reduce task loading?

marchand
01-15-2008, 10:50
I attached clips to everything so when I'm not using it I can clip it off. A wrist computer is helpful because you don't have to grab it to look at it.

I also got doubles so I don't have to switch out tanks between dives.

MSilvia
01-15-2008, 11:42
I made a "policy change" after task loading very nearly got me into trouble on a deep dark dive. Simply stated, if at all possible I don't introduce more than one new thing per dive.

Mycroft
01-15-2008, 12:02
I made a "policy change" after task loading very nearly got me into trouble on a deep dark dive. Simply stated, if at all possible I don't introduce more than one new thing per dive.

I have a variation on that rule. No more than one new piece of equipment in the life support loop for any given dive. And tha tincludes repairs.

Outside the life support loop, well, that's a judgement call.

Everything is either clipped off, or able to be dropped clear and retrieved later.

awap
01-15-2008, 12:08
I have a bungee loop on each wrist so even things in my hands (light, knife, magnifying glass, bottom probe) are clipped off and can be dropped without loss.

cyclone3565
01-15-2008, 12:50
I try to be comfortable with everything before trying or adding something new. One does not need all the gadgets at once and I love gadgets. You should be able to find/remove/replace your gear in the dark, which is absolutely worst case. Remember Stop Think Act

skdvr
01-15-2008, 17:53
Remember Stop Think Act


Very simple and very good advice. I have a similar one that I like to tell people when they are trying something new..

Slow is fast.

If you take a second to think about what you need to do, you can then do it without fumbling around or trying to rush something.

I like the saying, and it has served me well in both scuba and skydiving.

Phil

in_cavediver
01-15-2008, 18:18
When it comes to task loading, the single best thing to do is an honest self appraisal. Can I really handle it and everything I have to do? For many divers, a camera is too much. Remember - Dive first, then do whatever else you want to do.

Tightly coupled is a minimalist idea of why take it if you don't need it. I don't carry a reel, SMB, backup mask, can light etc on every dive. If you take less to start with, you have less things to generate tasks. Make sure you do take what you need though. If boat diving, a SMB isn't optional for instance.

Aussie
01-15-2008, 20:30
When it comes to task loading, the single best thing to do is an honest self appraisal. Can I really handle it and everything I have to do? For many divers, a camera is too much. Remember - Dive first, then do whatever else you want to do.

Tightly coupled is a minimalist idea of why take it if you don't need it. I don't carry a reel, SMB, backup mask, can light etc on every dive. If you take less to start with, you have less things to generate tasks. Make sure you do take what you need though. If boat diving, a SMB isn't optional for instance.

I agree with Cavediver here as well. Take what you really need to take. Seen a few divers taking lots of gear down when most of it should have been left on the boat as it wasnt really needed.

As for task loading I believe in practice. Start off with something your comfortable with and can use effectively and slowly move onto more. Also practice in a safe and easy environment first and slowly move onto harder environments.

Diving with doubles inside wrecks/caves with a large dSLR can be tricky and as someone said before slow is fast.

Aussie

BTW if the sh*t hits the fan, dump the extra cr*p you have as your own personal safety is more important than loosing gear.

Mycroft
01-18-2008, 14:57
Dropping the extra is always there. but does anyone have any other tips to avoid task loading in the first place?

ianr33
01-18-2008, 15:52
I think the key is to get most tasks automatic so that you are only having to concentrate on one thing at a time. e.g if you are running a reel the only thing you need to be thinking about is where to do the tie offs,other things such as bouyancy,equalising,mask clearing are done on a subconscious level. The only way to get to that stage is to dive a lot and add one thing into the mix at a time.

On a practical level a light with a Goodman handle and wrist gauges are 2 of the most useful things for me.

Gombessa
01-18-2008, 19:14
I'm almost always task-loaded to a point when carrying my camera, but I can't bring myself to leave the boat without it. I have it setup now to be clipped off to a d-ring. Since it's negatively buoyant, I hope it doesn't hang too low to drag, and yet remains accessible...we'll see on the next dive.

Mycroft
01-18-2008, 20:00
On a practical level a light with a Goodman handle and wrist gauges are 2 of the most useful things for me.

What is a Goodman handle?

And in the earlier part of the thread, I talked about mounting my lights to either my camera or to my scooter, so I know what you mean.

cummings66
02-04-2008, 22:25
It's a bracket that you slip your hand into and it's attached to the light so that it's on your hand yet you're not holding it as such. It's often metal but sometimes elastic band material. I prefer the metal.

Very useful when it comes to lights.

cummings66
02-04-2008, 22:29
How to avoid task loading, well, you get so good doing whatever it is you no longer think about it.

Remember when you had to think about clearing, now you just do it? Well, that is the same thing but extended to all facets of diving. I'm not there.

What I do is simple, I dive the same config all the time because it helps me do it without thinking, but if I change it I do so one part at a time. Currently the only new thing I've added is doubles and so far they're not a big deal, but the valve drill is something I'm working on. I can do it without feeling rushed in 2 minutes, but I'm aiming for 1. That'll happen when it becomes subconscious, or with more practice.

When I dive with a new buddy I consider that as a new addition to the dive gear and don't take my cameras or toys on the first dive, sometimes the first couple dives.

That's how I avoid it, mostly.

Aussie
02-05-2008, 06:23
http://www.deepbluedive.com/image.ashx?id=24274

Green Force Goodman Handle

Aussie

SarahBella
02-05-2008, 10:49
Whenever I get new gear I like to test it out on a shallow dive to make sure its not going to get me into trouble. I also like to make sure to let my buddy/S.O. know if there is something new on my rig-not to mention practice makes perfect.

Mycroft
02-05-2008, 13:45
I've seen a Goodman handle, just never heard it called that before.