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easyrider003
01-31-2008, 18:58
I guess maybe someone who is a firefighter may be able to help a little better. The fire department I work for has its own cascade system, is used to fill air bottles for firefighting. It is an eagleair brand system. I am one of the ones that fills our air bottles so I am familiar with how to operate the system. I was told that I could by an adapter and fill my scuba tanks with the cascade system. Does anyone know of a place that I may could buy an adapter other than the eagleair company? It would save me money in the longrun by doing it myself. I dive just plain air no gases or anything mixed in.

cummings66
01-31-2008, 19:23
Something like this maybe?

http://www.leisurepro.com/Prod/AQU45010.html

Call scubatoys on the phone, they have stuff they don't list and maybe they have an adaptor for you as well.

easyrider003
01-31-2008, 19:32
Yup. Thats it. Thanks

Jipps
02-04-2008, 10:25
glad you found your adaptor. wish i could fill my own tanks, lol.

fire diver
02-06-2008, 16:37
I'm in charge of the compressor / cascade system for my fire dept. One thing you need to pay attention to is the testing and maintenance of the system. Many smaller or volunteer depts don't pay attention to thier systems very well. things that won't hurt you at all in a house fire can become huge problem when breathing it at depth.

Our air is tested quarterly for moisture, oil, CO, and gaseous hydrocarbons. I also regularly open up the filter stacks and physically check the filter media. We had a drier stack failure early on with our new system that let huge amounts of moisture go through. We had to drain the entire 12 tank cascade, and start over. That's only because I knew the danger of moisture in the compressed air (adiabatic cooling). No one else would have done a thing or even checked the system.

So my point of all that, make sure you know what you are putting in your SCUBA tanks! I have saved hundreds using my FD air.

Good luck.

FD

tienie
02-06-2008, 21:53
ok call me stupid
why do firefighers wear their tanks
"upside down" compared to scuba divers?

fire diver
02-06-2008, 22:07
ok call me stupid
why do firefighers wear their tanks
"upside down" compared to scuba divers?

Mainly for the same reason divers were theirs the way they do. It's just how it's always been done. No one wants to change the status quo.

I will say that the firefighter method makes it VERY easy to reach your valve. Firemen also have much more need to turn a tank off or back on while still wearing it.

The scuba method allows tanks to be stored on a boat, with gear attached, ready to go.

FD

easyrider003
02-06-2008, 22:42
ok call me stupid
why do firefighers wear their tanks
"upside down" compared to scuba divers?

I asked this same question when I was going through Rookie school to get certified as a firefighter. They told me that it was because in a house fire you are always bumping into things and with the bottle upside down the valve will not get broken off by running into something.

Also I never thought about the moisture build up and everything that you stated to me. We drain ours every saturday to let out the moisture but to my knowledge in the four years that I have been there, the air has never been tested or anything

CaptainRon
02-09-2008, 23:19
We work in an environment where danger can comes from overhead falling debris. So the SCBA (Self Contained Breathing Aparatus) harnesses are designed to put the valve down where it is more protected from falling debris. That's the same reason we wear helmets that have a long brim in the back. It wouldn't be good to have something fall, hit the valve on top, and break it off...Can you say "Rocket Man?"

SHAGGY
02-14-2008, 19:33
I bet this company can fix up up. My Department just purchased a portable compressor from them. They can service just about anything out there.


August Industries for Bauer Compressors, Davey and Worthington parts and supplies (http://www.augustindustries.com/)

shaggy

in_cavediver
02-14-2008, 20:25
All this FD talk makes me wonder just how many Firefighters are on this site?

Myself, Diver and Volunteer FF

coyote
02-14-2008, 20:26
Just curious… but I always wondered why a fire department would use an open circuit system instead of the rebreathers used for mine rescue. Is it simply cost or habit or some factor I’m not aware of?

in_cavediver
02-14-2008, 20:33
Just curious… but I always wondered why a fire department would use an open circuit system instead of the rebreathers used for mine rescue. Is it simply cost or habit or some factor I’m not aware of?

OC stuff is reliable and doesn't come with RB dangers. Some hazmat stuff uses the mine type rebreathers for longer duration exposures but its not common for structural firefighting. When you go RB, you have to watch for hypocapnia and hypoxia, OC you don't, just empty bottles and you have low air bell for that as well.

All that said, OC stuff is simple to use, simple to train on and simple to refill/change on scene. Its the whole kiss prinicple.

fire diver
02-14-2008, 21:36
Just curious… but I always wondered why a fire department would use an open circuit system instead of the rebreathers used for mine rescue. Is it simply cost or habit or some factor I’m not aware of?

It's work load. We use 4500psi bottles, but most guys prefer the bottle to be lower than that. More air time means more work time. Working inside a structure fire wears you out pretty fast. No one wants to spend an hour inside before coming out to change bottles.

FD

cummings66
02-14-2008, 21:40
I asked this same question when I was going through Rookie school to get certified as a firefighter. They told me that it was because in a house fire you are always bumping into things and with the bottle upside down the valve will not get broken off by running into something.


My brother in law is a LT in the fire department, worked his way up. But I do recall he said the exact same thing, it's because there is more risk in damaging it right side up. I'd say that's the reason because apparently it's taught in more than one location. I'm not sure where he did his schooling but I know it's in MO.

I know a guy who's a trainer for aircraft fires and they follow the same rules, well how they do things is different for planes vs houses of course.