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Rascal1933
07-28-2007, 18:42
Just wondering how you a diver you would rate the importance.

Zenagirl
07-28-2007, 18:48
I think it's important to be fit, particularly as a diver. Although I'm fatter than I'd like to be, I started a fitness program about 6 months ago, and on our recent liveaboard trip, not only could I tell the difference in my SAC rate, but also in the ease of getting back on the boat lifting heavy gear.

This has helped motivate me to add a better weight training program to my fitness routine, and to work toward eating less and losing the extra fat. I anticipate by doing this that in 6 months I'll see even bigger rewards than the first 6 months gave me. :D

Ajuva
07-28-2007, 18:48
It is so important I have just spent the last three months training for my Holidays.

Well, maybe not entirely true, but the fitter you are the better you dive.

Queen
07-28-2007, 18:51
Like any other activity, you should be as fit as is needed (more so if you choose). If you're the diver who only dives occasionally, looks at the pretty fishes and stays at 25' your fitness needs are very different than someone who heads out to dive the Doria.

Rascal1933
07-28-2007, 18:53
Do you guy's think being fit,helps reduce your Air consumption at all?

thesmoothdome
07-28-2007, 18:58
I think you need to be fit enough to deal with the worst conditions you'll ever dive in.

When I was younger, we used to do a lot of shore diving, sometimes in big surf, and you had to be fit enough to fight your way in and out through the breakers, swim out, dive and swim back, all the while having enough left in the tank to help a buddy out if needed. How fit is that? Beats me, but I'm not fit enough to do that stuff right now.

Ajuva
07-28-2007, 18:58
Definitely,

I have seen a marked difference in only 3 months.

picxie
07-28-2007, 19:14
I think fitness is very important. I'm not fit enough at the moment (not enough to my liking anyway) but I'm not actively diving so I'm not worried too much ... although I know that by not keeping up my fitness now, I'll have to work harder before summer hits and I want to get back in the water =) I notice a definate difference when I'm fitter - easier in and out of the water, and much easier to carry that heavy gear around!!

yeroks
07-28-2007, 21:05
I'd say very important. The latest issue of Dive Training mentions some DAN statistics regarding obesity and diving.

Moxie
07-28-2007, 21:41
Personally, I think fitness is a huge factor in diving. I do tons of shore diving where it's really tough climbing over rocks, logs, up and down huge hills etc. Add drysuit, add weights, add tank etc.

However, if I only dove off a boat with DM's who helped me out with everything it might not be so important.

WaterRat
07-28-2007, 22:39
Fitness is very important, this coming from an overweight diver working to get fit. However, I know it helps SAC rate, offgassing, lugging heavy dive gear, panic reflex, stamina, etc...

Ron

texdiveguy
07-28-2007, 22:45
Very important to stay as fit as possible....the more technical your diving becomes the greater your fitness level needs to improve or maintain.

fire diver
07-28-2007, 22:55
I think fitness is very important for everyone. If you have a physical hobby such as SCUBA, you need to be fitter than the average person. Tanks and gear are heavy, lugging them over rough terrain for a shore dive can take alot out of you. If you should have the need to swim against a current, cardiovascular as well as muscular endurance can mean the difference between success, or being swept out to sea and doing the whole "Open Water" thing until the boat finds you.

Not to mention it helps lower your SAC!

FD

TxHockeyGuy
07-29-2007, 10:58
I think your level of required fitness depends on the conditions you dive in. I believe the certification agencies got things right with requiring a 200 yard swim (I'm against the 300 yard mask/snorkel/fin PADI allows). That's a good starting point and should let you dive easy conditions with confidence. As you enter more dangerous and trying conditions you need to adjust your level of fitness appropriately.

Someone had mentioned the DAN article on obesity and diving accidents. This was discussed in length over on ScubaBoard and I don't put too much faith in that article. For one the method in which we determine obesity is incredibly flawed. I just ran the numbers for the Dallas Stars lineup through the BMI calculator and virtually everyone came up as overweight and at least one came up as obese. If you go try this on a football team I bet the vast majority of the team will be shown to be obese. Our method for determining obesity is flawed and therefor the usefulness of articles concerning obesity has to be called into question.

Queen
07-29-2007, 11:09
I think your level of required fitness depends on the conditions you dive in. I believe the certification agencies got things right with requiring a 200 yard swim (I'm against the 300 yard mask/snorkel/fin PADI allows). That's a good starting point and should let you dive easy conditions with confidence. As you enter more dangerous and trying conditions you need to adjust your level of fitness appropriately.

Someone had mentioned the DAN article on obesity and diving accidents. This was discussed in length over on ScubaBoard and I don't put too much faith in that article. For one the method in which we determine obesity is incredibly flawed. I just ran the numbers for the Dallas Stars lineup through the BMI calculator and virtually everyone came up as overweight and at least one came up as obese. If you go try this on a football team I bet the vast majority of the team will be shown to be obese. Our method for determining obesity is flawed and therefor the usefulness of articles concerning obesity has to be called into question.

Agreed, I'm a big ol gal and have low cholesterol, low BP, low resting pulse, I'm in excellent shape, am pretty strong (never need help with my gear), and can sip on a tank of air til the cows come home...but I'm still fat.

DougNR
07-29-2007, 13:24
I think the important thing is diving within your physical abilities. Clearly an unexpected situation could occur that might require physical ability beyond those any individual has. That is why we plan our dives, and stick with our plan. I'm 53 so I don't try to dive like I have the stamina of a 25 year old.

yeroks
07-29-2007, 18:19
Judging by what I've seen on most of my dives, I'd say the high numbers that DAN refers to are more than likely fat people and not Brian Urlacher types that qualify as obese due to the somewhat flawed logic of most BMI calculations.

TxHockeyGuy
07-29-2007, 18:27
Judging by what I've seen on most of my dives, I'd say the high numbers that DAN refers to are more than likely fat people and not Brian Urlacher types that qualify as obese due to the somewhat flawed logic of most BMI calculations.

True, but the vast majority of big divers I dive with are in good shape despite their weight, better shape than many of the divers that are in the "normal" category. I'm a big diver and am considered obese by BMI but I can easily out swim the majority of "normal" divers I've been with. I am overweight, I know it, and I am working on that although not as hard as I should be. Then again I'm also 28 and active so I am not that likely to have a heart attack, even being "obese". In fact I'll be headed to the gym here shortly, got to work off that pizza I had for dinner.

Disneymom
07-29-2007, 18:52
I learned the hard way on this one - I'm a middle aged secretary type person, and am NOT in shape. Probably about 30 lbs overweight. When I did my first pool dive I wound up physically exhausted and mentally exhausted about half way through. Granted, I'd already done my swim, which just about kicked my butt.

2 months later and I'm swimming 700 - 800 yards in my pool every few nights, and going to a gym almost every day for cardio and weight training. Back in the pool about 3 weeks after starting this regimen and it was a breeze. I'm still "fluffy" and still middle aged, but I sure as heck wasn't winded this weekend after a 3 dive day.

I'm a firm believer that fitness is important (and you can be fluffy and fit, you're just fluffy on top of the fit...I'd love to be just fit but don't see that happenin' soon). I expect to see my SAC rate decrease as my stamina continues to increase over the next few months.

rktman26
07-29-2007, 20:34
I believe it's "situationally dependant". As long as you can haul your own gear and are safe in the conditions in which you dive, then you're fine.

Fitness is important to me not solely because I dive, it's somewhat who I am and what I do. I ran a marathon last year, and I'm running it again this year. I run 3-4 times a week, and I swim a mile tice a week. But that's just me.

I think some people forget that SCUBA diving is a "recreational" sport. You don't need the best equipment, or to be in the perfect dive location, or be in the best shape. If You enjoy your diving, then it's fine for you.

Let me throw out this disclaimer- I'm a newbie, I may not know what the heck I'm talking about.

Ruminari
07-30-2007, 20:02
I too think that fitness is an integral part of diving. You have to begin by looking at just swimming. It takes a fair amount of fitness to be able to swim for an hour, although SCUBA isn't nearly as difficult as donig a breaststroke for an hour it still is a physically demanding sport.

cummings66
07-30-2007, 20:16
I think being fit is good, but not to the extent that somebody would mistake me for Arnold, unless it was the paycheck they were writing.

I am not as fit as I'd like, I will get better over time. I know it will help my diving to be more in shape, but diving isn't a sport where you need super human strength either. There is a happy median for it.

TAH 73
07-30-2007, 21:25
Keeping fit is important to the idea of improving your abilitiy to dive better, but look at in another way, being fit will allow you to be active and healthy longer letting you keep diving.

ChrisA
07-31-2007, 02:04
Just wondering how you a diver you would rate the importance.

The politically correct and trendy answer is that you need to be fit but the truth is that if you are just doing easy boat dives in no current all you have to do is roll off the deck and splash into the water and hang there weightless for 45 minutes of so and then there is a platform where you get out.

But... I've had to tow a buddy up current twice. Diving at the beach when the surf is up and take some physical effort. And for some reason here in So Cal the parking lots are always up on top of some bluff and the ocean is always on the botton of some long steep path. Walking up takes some effort.

For some reason the very oveweight ad out of shape divers don't dive at the beach. Diving can be a very low energy sport if yu pick you site
and condition and just do the easy dives

TopSully
07-31-2007, 12:07
I'm a newbie to diving, but to potentially dangerous situations. You should be "reasonably fit" to undertake any activity that could be considered dangerous. "Reasonably fit" should mean mentally as well as phsyically. I was in the Marine Corps for a long, long time. Fitness was important for obvious reasons, but also because an unfit Marine is dangerous, and possibly deadly to his fellow Marines. I also ride motorcycles, sometimes with others. If someone else is "unfit" to ride due to either a physical weakness, is too tired to be alert or has been drinking, they are a danger not just to themselves but others. As a diver I want to be fit enough so that I don't endanger myself, a dive buddy or a dive master. I don't think that means you need be a gym rat, but you do need to mentally and physically prepared to handle the regular rigors of your dive and the possibility that something might go wrong.

the gooch
07-31-2007, 21:25
Being in shape is definitely an important aspect to diving.

DirtyWaterIL
07-31-2007, 23:05
i think properly fit for diving is one of those hard to define things. obviously being a top shape athlete would be best, but i know several people whoa re overweight with poor diets who get along just fine underwater.

Rick155
08-01-2007, 12:53
Being fit is obviously important: It helps you maximize your bottom time. It helps you minimize your risk. It helps you in the inevitable stressful situations where confidence in your own skills and strength can play a large and important role.

DAN says that 20-30 percent of all scuba-related deaths are caused by "cardiovascular events", ie, heart attacks. How many of those are caused by the diver's lack of basic fitness? My guess: probably a large percentage of them.

I don't agree with the idea that if one is diving only in relatively shallow depths in warm, clear and familiar waters, then fitness is less important. That's roughly equivalent to saying, "I'm just driving a couple miles from home to the supermarket; what can happen?" The answer of course is that anything can happen. Why do you take a signaling device with you on every dive? Because you want to be prepared for whatever might happen, no matter how unlikely it seems. Fitness is just another kind of basic preparation. Like that signaling device, you can make many uneventful dives without it. But one day you'll be very glad you have it. Besides, fitness pays off on every dive with better mobility, better breathing efficiency....it's a no brainer!

thor
08-01-2007, 12:58
We spend so much time making sure that all of our equipment is in the best working order. Why shouldn't our bodies fit into the same category? Fitness is important to every aspect of diving.

DiveCaptain
08-02-2007, 22:14
I feel like an idiot, but what does SAC rate stand for? I can't find it anywhere on DAN or the internet in general. Please be kind to my inferior intellect.

WaterRat
08-02-2007, 23:10
I feel like an idiot, but what does SAC rate stand for? I can't find it anywhere on DAN or the internet in general. Please be kind to my inferior intellect.

Surface Air Consumption

You figure out how many PSI/minute you consume on the surface and you can use that to calculate gas cunsumption at depth. Here's a link I found.

http://www.mindspring.com/~divegeek/estimating.htm

Ron

DiveCaptain
08-03-2007, 10:41
Thanks for the info. The website was pretty good. A lot of reading but very informative. Felt like I was in school. :)

liuk3
08-07-2007, 20:14
I think that this is the beauty of diving. You can take it as serious as you want it to be. The more serious you are about your diving, the more fit you should be. However, the amazing thing is that you can be out of shape and obese, and still enjoy yourself scuba diving leisurely in shallow water. Of course, I do believe that the more fit your are, the safer you will be assuming a constant skill level.

DivingsInMyBlood
08-08-2007, 00:09
I belive a little bit of fitness is a good thing you really dont want to dive if your hacking up a lung all the time.

nferra2
08-08-2007, 01:46
I was hoping going diving and swimming would help me get more fit...

REO
08-12-2007, 18:43
I was hoping going diving and swimming would help me get more fit...
Diving and swimming will help.

Add diet and regular aerobic exercise, and you will get fit sooner.

I've been on a diet program and have been walking an hour each day, and I've lost over 30 lbs so far. I still have another 30 to go.

Don't give up, and best of luck to you.

Ron

nferra2
08-12-2007, 18:49
My Dad did WeightWatchers and Lost over 100lbs, He is now probably 20lbs lighter than me. Diving helped me reach one goal, I quit smoking. Now If I just loose a little weight (20-30lbs) I should be good to go. I don't know how much diving I am going to get in this year, but next year I plan on being in the water alot.

Rick155
08-13-2007, 12:12
Anyone who's ever had to swim against a strong current for any amount of time knows how important fitness can be.

Anecdote: The last time I was in FL, we dived the Duane, (http://www.upperkeysdivesites.com/z_panorama/divesites_java.cfm?siteID=2) a great wreck sitting in about 120 ft of water. We noticed a pretty good current on the way down. When we hit the deck of the boat the current was ripping. Swimming against it during the first half of the dive was a chore. Aerobic fitness was definitely a plus for anyone on that dive. Currents can be unpredicable, which is just one more reason why I believe you don't maintain fitness for the conditions you expect, but rather the conditions you don't expect.

ScubaJenn81
08-20-2007, 08:27
Being more fit makes a huge difference in air consumption, I think. When I dive with my husband (who does not exercise, while I do 5 times a week) I always come back with around 1000 PSI higher then he does.

cgvmer
08-20-2007, 08:36
Fitness is important, I'm definetly overweight but swim and walk regularly ... I dove when I wasn't swimming and walking regularly and felt the difference.

DivingCRNA
08-20-2007, 17:26
Fitness is less important when I an floating with the current in cozumel at 40 feet than when I am at 156 feet in the local lake.

I will have to double check, but nitrogen is probably more soluble in fat than lean tissue. So do the math on that dive....:smiley16:

Ted S
08-20-2007, 17:53
To me, being fit is jut one of those things you should do to dive safely. Even someone who only dives off the back of "full service" boats and never has to surface swim or haul gear is putting themselves at risk if they aren't moderately fit. In the event of a bad situation, a sudden current, unconscious diver or one of another thousand scenarios being fit is going to help. For older divers, fitness goes hand in hand with reduced health issues and is perhaps even more important.

I'm not saying that someone who is not completely fit shouldn't dive; almost everyone could improve in their fitness, I'm certainly no exception. However, if you can't walk with your gear from the car to the beach for a shore dive, there's an issue and you may want to consider the risk you're putting on yourself and your buddies. Perhaps more important than being the most fit diver is recognizing your true fitness level and addressing it accordingly.

wxboy911
08-20-2007, 19:01
Being fit is one thing I agree is necessary for diving as well as life-I am staying fit to be a better diver and to live longer. Longer life=more dives-and my family does not mind either.

mountaindiver
08-20-2007, 19:24
Just look at the DAN website, and download the 2006 DAN Diving Report, that should convince you.

Where's The Water?

Buoyant1
08-20-2007, 19:56
Just look at the DAN website, and download the 2006 DAN Diving Report, that should convince you.

Where's The Water?


Heck just look at the accidents and incidents threads on all the popular forums! Almost every accident had something to do with a fitness issue!

Hit the gym, or go for a walk people!

scubasamurai
08-31-2007, 19:16
i think it is very important, helps with bottom time and air comsumption. plus if you get into trouble or your buddy does, you have some reserve to "bail" your butt out. being overweight is not a good way to get into the water, remember mrs piggy you look like a sausage in that wetsuit!!!! and things do appear bigger in water

Suther2136
08-31-2007, 22:00
I think it helps a lot, the more the better

coralcrazed
09-13-2007, 14:10
I think it's important to be fit, particularly as a diver. Although I'm fatter than I'd like to be, I started a fitness program about 6 months ago, and on our recent liveaboard trip, not only could I tell the difference in my SAC rate, but also in the ease of getting back on the boat lifting heavy gear.

This has helped motivate me to add a better weight training program to my fitness routine, and to work toward eating less and losing the extra fat. I anticipate by doing this that in 6 months I'll see even bigger rewards than the first 6 months gave me. :D

a fit diver is a smart diver. this is why I'm stupid. :smilie39: than again look at wales, they say they are smart. ok ok not as smart as dolphins. I guess its time to hit the gym.:smilie39:

Bill22
09-13-2007, 19:53
I do a lot of beach diving here in Japan. I've worked at increasing my fitness level since I started diving here the beginning of July. I've noticed a big difference in the way I feel when I dive. I was so exhausted after the first time that I went diving at Hayama, that I wondered was it really "worth it" or not. The long walk, wading through the water, making our way along the sand bar and then across the rocks, followed by the swim out to the dive site, followed by having to fight the surge, the dive, then having to do it all in reverse, really took a lot out of me on that first dive :-))

Since the beginning of July I've lost 24 lbs (217 down to 193). I've watched my diet pretty closely and worked out on a regular basis (elliptical and swimming). The swimming I see as being particularly important since it is the workout that is closest to diving.

Now I do the dive at Hayama without even thinking about it ;-) I think a higher fitness level can certainly translate into more enjoyment of the sport and greater oppourtunities to dive. Some areas it just wouldn't be safe to get in the water if you weren't fit.

I'm planning in the neighborhood of 50 dives in a two week period when I go to the Philippines next month. That's a lot of diving in a relatively short period of time. I think if I accomplish that or not, will have a lot to do with my fitness level.

I'll be starting my Rescue Diver/Divemaster training after I come back. Fitness is definitely important at that level!

franksrq
09-17-2007, 23:57
Being fit is all a part of being able to enjoy yourself in an activity that some consider dangerous. i know what i am physically capable of because i constabtly test and push myself, and i think that will help me stay calm in an emergency.

jo8243
09-18-2007, 06:36
If you're not fit and you encounter challenging conditions (current, long swim, injured buddy), you may not be up to the task. Divers should be fit.

greyzen
09-18-2007, 09:09
While I don't think you need to be competing for Mr./Mrs. Fitness, I do think you should lead an 'active' lifestyle.

Even during my OW you could notice a huge difference between three classmates who were extremists.

1 was a tri-athlete, she wasn't even mildly tired after several hours in a pool.
Two of the class were, to be polite, rather large people and though nice.. you could tell about halfway through the classes they were more just pushing through the class instead of learning.
If you happened to get in the way of one of them... they would bowl you right over.. and I think it was because they were so tired they couldn't move around you.

ccarter
09-18-2007, 11:06
I think it's pretty important.. but I have a fairly pretty active lifestyle any way with a mountain biking obsession. I can notice a difference from times I've been diving when I haven't been riding as much or at all.. it's much easier when I'm actually in shape.. and generally I'll use less air even though I don't get that many dives in a year.

BobArnold8265
09-18-2007, 12:19
I don't think you have to be able to run a marathon to dive but certainly being fit has its' advantages. If you're overweight, often it requires more lead to get you down. You are less streamline and use alot more air. In addition to diving though, I think being at a reasonable level of fitness allows you to enjoy all things in life a little better (and possibly for a little longer !!)

DZorn00
09-19-2007, 11:33
I am 316lbs and just to use less weight to sink is well worth the effort to cut lbs and get into shape,
:smilie40:

Tableleg
09-19-2007, 12:48
In the past year, I've lost about 40 lbs (from 216 to a current 178) by fixing my diet and exercise. Here lately, I've been swimming a bunch, and I can remember this time last year being able to float close to the surface of the water when I exailed.

I'm to the point now where if I exhale and I'm not holding onto anything, I sink right to the bottom.... :smiley36:

If loosing fat and gaining muscle has done anything for me, it's much easier to lug around all my gear because I don't have to carry so much weight. I only needed 8 lbs last dive I went on wearing a 5-4-3 wet suit. :smiley20:

peteg
09-19-2007, 14:31
It's very important, not just because being fit makes it easier to lug heavy gear around, and reduces your SAC, but because a healthy Cardio/Pulmonary system helps off-gas nitrogen faster. Although NDL recreational diving is very safe, being healthy stacks the deck in your favor just a little bit more against that 1 in a million chance of an undeserved hit.

scubasavvy
09-19-2007, 23:10
I definitely think fitness is important. As mentioned before, it helps your air consumption when you're not sucking wind and it also helps to be able to get back on the boat at the end of the dive...

divingyogini
09-21-2007, 12:09
Given my experience and the cold water divers I've seen, I initially would have said somewhat important. But then I took a rescue class and had to do tired diver toes and carry people up onto the shore. Now I say it's very important - both the cardio vascular stamina to do the tows and the strength to carry people up onto shore.

When I say fit, I basically mean they have average fitness, not triathlete fitness. Basically following the basic guidelines of cardio training 3 times per week and resistance/strength training 2 times per week. I would also add in flexibility so that people can put their gear on comfortably and to avoid injury.

Diverdude
09-27-2007, 15:54
I agree that being fit for diving, or anything really, is very important. Having a strong core can allow you to do lots of different activities so much easier, such as moving in the water, lugging around heavy gear, towing a downed diver, etc... Plus, having a good strong cardio/pulmonary system can help with avoiding overexcersion underwater and can make swiming against currents a lot easier. Just my 2 cents.

kingfish
09-28-2007, 01:00
I am in the process of making myself fitter as i was quite unfit when i first started to dive and i struggled with the gear and i struggled swimming in the current.

Jas.

ccarter
09-28-2007, 08:30
I agree that being fit for diving, or anything really, is very important. Having a strong core can allow you to do lots of different activities so much easier, such as moving in the water, lugging around heavy gear, towing a downed diver, etc... Plus, having a good strong cardio/pulmonary system can help with avoiding overexcersion underwater and can make swiming against currents a lot easier. Just my 2 cents.
Agreed. Strong core & good cardio will go a long way to improving the fun you can have with just about any activity.. hiking.. kayaking.. even horseback riding..

Most activities end up improving on cardio or our core as we're doing them though.. Scuba is a little different in that we're trying not to exert ourselves as much while under the water so it's necessary (I think) to have some other activities you enjoy that work on your cardio while topside. I'm not one to be able to handle prolonged times at the gym though..

For me mountain biking is my "primary" activity and scuba is something I do on vacations.. mainly because it's easier for me to get out and do since there's no water around me and it works you out a lot..

jimmysdevoted
09-28-2007, 08:46
I am alarge person. Have been all of my life. and what i found out with just snorkeling is that in a week I can drop 5-7 pounds. with no change in diet.
Being diabetic I am on a very good diet and to prevent kidney disease that accompanies it a very light diet.
I thhink what we are seeing as far as Males go is more or less ascites or beer belly weight in a majority. there as a companion article and CME at medscape on sports and a majority found that sports people tend to drink more alcohol which leads to more storage of water in the fat cells spaces.

Women loose or stay stable more because we dont consume more. It was just an opinion that was done by some sports doctors. I dont buy it. The american public is becoming larger because of the lack of need for daily exercise. And planned exercise is different than everyday work. We have become a sedentery society.

being fit is something that no matter how little you do will make a marked improvment in air consumption and overall ability to do things.

Charles R
09-28-2007, 08:59
Very important it help reduce stress levels

caroln
09-28-2007, 10:01
Cardiovascular fitness is very important because if you look at 'diving accidents', many of them are actually a cardio problem that probably could have happened anywhere, but just happened to occur while diving. The fitter you are, the better your body can handle the stresses of being in the water--and even an easy dive does have it's stresses to the body, since we're basically putting ourselves in a completely un-natural environment for human beings to survive in. I don't think being skinny persay is the key, but being fit, having endurance, and a strong healthy hearty and lungs.

BuzzF117
09-28-2007, 16:01
One of the reasons I got into diving was other health issues. I am in my late 30's and already suffer from osteo arthritis in my hips and wanted something that was low impact but still had me outdoors doing something. I have no problem schleping my gear out of the water onto a dive boat. I used to enjoy using the push mower in the yard but now I can't deal with the pain afterward but diving does not cause me any problems with pain in my hips but I do have to be careful how I rotate my hips during a dive. I have never been a lathargic slug and I really don't want to become one.

dallasdivergirl
09-28-2007, 16:07
I try to keep fit for personal reasons. I also have a very active dog that keeps me running & on my toes at all times. I think it's important to be fit for any sport or recreation.

jimmysdevoted
09-28-2007, 16:49
I think any level of fitness is a mobious loop.
If you are fit even just a teensy bit you feel better, if you feel better your apt to enjoy recreation, which in turn makes you feel better which makes recreation more enjoyable.
I think where many people run itno problems is not necesserily their fitness level but their stress levels. Many try to cram dive time, recreation time into a specific time table, and if anything glitches wiht that they get stressed. Its like if your down, looking at say a boat, wreck or even snorkeling coral, snd you ahve it in the back of your mind the " clock is ticking" you have to be at work etc, your apt to stress out in what you are doing. so fitness maybe a great way to condition, but it doesnt help if you are on the clock.

CaribbeanDiver
09-29-2007, 07:40
I think it's important to be fit, particularly as a diver. Although I'm fatter than I'd like to be, I started a fitness program about 6 months ago, and on our recent liveaboard trip, not only could I tell the difference in my SAC rate, but also in the ease of getting back on the boat lifting heavy gear.

This has helped motivate me to add a better weight training program to my fitness routine, and to work toward eating less and losing the extra fat. I anticipate by doing this that in 6 months I'll see even bigger rewards than the first 6 months gave me. :D
got any pictures? we want pictures of before and after to motivate us. Nothing like a trim woman in a bathing suit to motivate men toward dieting and exercise. Just reading your post, I did 2 situps and thought of doing 3 pushups but decided to pace myself and do the pushups tomorrow.

jlittlejohn321
09-29-2007, 08:57
I think you need to be fit because with my dad who dives he lost 50 pounds and can stay under about 5 minuted longer which a lot of the time is when ive seen the most activity. So yes i think its important

Steve Scuba
09-30-2007, 14:36
I'd say it's a huge benefit. I'm a runner, and though I'm still in my cert classes, I seem to use a lot less air than the other students.

ccarter
09-30-2007, 15:04
I'd say it's a huge benefit. I'm a runner, and though I'm still in my cert classes, I seem to use a lot less air than the other students.
I noticed that too.. I didn't have as hard of a time on the swims either.

Tableleg
09-30-2007, 15:35
I got certified before my current level of fitness. the 100 yard swim was alright for about the first 25 yards. The next 75 were filled with thoughts of "Oh please, kill me now..." :smiley36:

Since then, I can go about 1000 before wanting to give up. :smiley20:

kingfish
09-30-2007, 16:23
I have noticed that it has become alot easier to carry the gear around since i have become fitter.
Simple things like climbing up the ladder of the boat when getting out of the water and even kneeling down to wash the mask out with the gear on have become alot easier.
I would find myself very puffed after a relatively short walk with the gear on.
I am so glad i have made the effort to get fitter.


Jas.

BobbyWombat
09-30-2007, 16:36
It is really important that you be in shape" Not perfect...but reasonably healthy.

CrzyJay456
09-30-2007, 19:29
i vote for some. i dont think you need to be all fit and buff, but i think you need to be able to swim in currents on the surface, and you need to be healthy. im more for healthy than fit.

scuba Widow
09-30-2007, 19:34
As a non diver I would think that you would have to have some level of fitness to be a diver just as you should for any exercise that you take part in.

highdesert
10-02-2007, 20:38
Do you guy's think being fit,helps reduce your Air consumption at all?

If "being fit" means engaging in aerobic work that increases your oxygen uptake (VO2), then there's no argument. I've been going harder on the road bike in advance of an upcoming big-dollar, blowout dive trip to Indonesia. I want every minute out of a tank I can get, and I know from experience and the science that my hours of aerobic work will mean time back out of every tank.

bubble-head
10-02-2007, 21:41
I believe being fit is very important for diving. Both cardio and core strength benefit divers. I have been very appreciative of my fitness level when I've encountered some strong currents and when climbing back onboard the boat. One thing I've learned over the years is that when a difficult situation arises, it's when you are at your weakest, physically and mentally. I also hope that being fit will allow me to dive at an older age.

Bill22
10-03-2007, 02:16
Do you guy's think being fit,helps reduce your Air consumption at all?

If "being fit" means engaging in aerobic work that increases your oxygen uptake (VO2), then there's no argument. I've been going harder on the road bike in advance of an upcoming big-dollar, blowout dive trip to Indonesia. I want every minute out of a tank I can get, and I know from experience and the science that my hours of aerobic work will mean time back out of every tank.


I believe being fit is very important for diving. Both cardio and core strength benefit divers. I have been very appreciative of my fitness level when I've encountered some strong currents and when climbing back onboard the boat. One thing I've learned over the years is that when a difficult situation arises, it's when you are at your weakest, physically and mentally. I also hope that being fit will allow me to dive at an older age.

I've been working steadily on my fitness level for the same reasons. I divide my aerobic workouts between the pool and the elliptical. I feel a LOT better in the water when I'm diving now. I have a pretty ambitious dive schedule set up for my upcoming Philippines trip. I know without my workouts it would be difficult to complete the number of dives I have planned.

Sometimes things like currents can be unpredicatble. If you get into a situation having the fitness to handle it can be the difference between having an "interesting" story to tell and a tragedy.

I'll be 50 my next birthday... not old, but definetly I'm noticing some changes. I to hope to be diving for many years to come and I know that maintaining my fitness levels is the key to that.

beperkins
10-16-2008, 13:56
The benefits of being physically fit are so great in every aspect of life that some times it is a wonder why we as a nation are letting ourselves go.

MSilvia
10-16-2008, 14:29
I think it's important to be fit. I don't think it's important to be fit to be a diver, but there are definately advantages to being fit... as there are in almost all other aspects of life.

coral cowgirl
10-16-2008, 15:25
It's important to my buddy that I'm fit.

MSilvia
10-16-2008, 16:42
It's important to my buddy that I'm fit.
It's important to my wife that I'm fit. Most of my dive buddies are happy as long as I can fit into my drysuit.

Splitlip
10-16-2008, 21:10
Let's think about this.

We are in an unnatural environment.
If the balloon goes up, we might need to:

Make a free ascent from depth without gas.
Make a long surface swim.
Tow an injured buddy.
Swim against a wicked current without over breathing the reg to avoid being pulled into a shipping channel.
Exert ourselves potentially putting ourselves at risk of DCS because a "working" dive can throw the tables out the window. (Cardio, cardio, cardio)
Etc.
It is important IMO.

MSilvia
10-17-2008, 10:55
While I don't think it's important to be "fit" to dive, I do think it's important to not be "unfit". In other words, you don't have to be athletic, but you do have to be able to walk up a flight of stairs without getting winded. If you can still pass an OW swim test, I think you're probably fine for most open water recreational dives.

Lulubelle
10-17-2008, 20:15
My two cents...it is very important to be healthy to dive. I've been out with some who scared me. One divemaster was very heavy, smoked, was uncomfortable in the current, had poor buoyancy control, was not very fit at all, burned up his air very fast, and we really had to keep our eye on him.

Now I am also heavy but fit,I exercise regularly and vigorously, don't smoke, was born swimming in the current, am a good and safe diver, and always come up because of bottom time not air.

divingyogini
10-17-2008, 20:41
After taking the Rescue Diver class and having to tow in men who weighed almost twice what I weigh and bring them onto the shore (ended up putting a guy on my back and crawling--it worked) my belief in having descent endurance and strength was totally reinforced. So yes, it's very important. I wouldn't dive with a buddy who couldn't rescue me if something happened. I would expect them to feel the same way too.

teog
11-21-2008, 13:12
As metioned a person doesnt need to be an olympian to dive. However basic pyschical activity is need. Ie walking, running, eliptical, on a regular basis. its important that person keep a good cardio work out for that endurance that is needed in the water.

heydn62
11-21-2008, 17:03
And remember, if something big and scary is coming after you, you don't have to outswim it if you can outswim your buddy. :bash:

teerlkay
11-25-2008, 21:22
Since I have started working out religiously I have more stamina when repetitive diving – that being said, I still look forward to my siesta but I don't go home shattered.

bsktcase93
11-26-2008, 13:23
i feel you should be fit. im not in the greatest shape, but i am very active and have the stamina and endurance. you never know when you are really going to need to swim hard and if your not able to do it you are putting your life on the line and everyone elses life on the line that is tring to help you....

ektess1
11-29-2008, 12:18
You can't be a good budy without being fit enough to assist in emergency. I try to stay fit so that I don't have an emergency. Plus you get more sex.

maverick
11-29-2008, 12:50
Being fit air consumption it all plays 2 gether in being a better diver. I exercise thru out the year just 2 stay fit and dive.

mrm777
11-29-2008, 16:03
After an expensive liveaboard trip I was on had to be cancelled the 3rd day because of a very unfit diver's collapse, I wish everyone I dive with was fit. It cost 12 other divers about $2,000 worth of diving each, not to mention airfare and all that goes with planning a vacation to a remote dive area.

Wetnurse28
11-30-2008, 09:05
I understand your concern. Let's hope that was just an isolated incident.

Being fit for any sport is of the utmost importance. I hope this gentlemen/lady realizes now how important it is to have a good fitness level.

Were the sea's high? I know lot of peeps that are fit divers but crumble because of sea sickness.

fanatique
02-09-2009, 12:28
I believe that with the gear we have today, diving as a hobby or a past-time is now open to less fit people. But if you want to truly enjoy scuba diving, fitness is paramount, especially out in the open where you need to give yourself a fitness buffer given unpredictable weather and the like. On top of that, being fit gives you confidence, which is essential to not panicking or getting into trouble in the water.