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DarinMartell
02-15-2008, 07:45
Hello, I am looking at buying a couple of these:

Used Catalina Super 80 Scuba Tank is high visability yellow. First hydro was 01/93, current hydro is 04/05 and has a current VIP.

The cost is $70, does this sound really good (like don't wait, buy them now), or is this a standard price for a decent used tank? They are local so I would not pay shipping.

Crimediver
02-15-2008, 08:04
That is a good price. If you need them grab 'em.

texdiveguy
02-15-2008, 08:10
Fair going price.

mwhities
02-15-2008, 08:27
That's a good price for those tanks. Being in current hydro/viz is even better. My dive buddy has two of the same and I have the exact same only in the 100cuft instead.

mike_s
02-15-2008, 08:36
Hello, I am looking at buying a couple of these:

Used Catalina Super 80 Scuba Tank is high visability yellow. First hydro was 01/93, current hydro is 04/05 and has a current VIP.

The cost is $70, does this sound really good (like don't wait, buy them now), or is this a standard price for a decent used tank? They are local so I would not pay shipping.


used regular AL80's right now seem to be going for $85 to $100 if they are in hydro and vis, from what I've seen...... You might see them $50 to $75 if they are out of hydro and vis..

so in my opinion. the deal you found is pretty good. If you need tanks, I'd get them. You can always sell them later for about the same price if you decide to upgrade to steel later.

charlesml3
02-15-2008, 13:00
if you decide to upgrade to steel later.

I keep hoping that some day, somebody will present a reasonable argument as to why steel is an "upgrade" to aluminum. There is more controversy over this than there is in regulator brands. It's just a TANK. It holds your breathing gas. Who cares if it's aluminum or steel?

-Charles

DarinMartell
02-15-2008, 13:09
if you decide to upgrade to steel later.

I keep hoping that some day, somebody will present a reasonable argument as to why steel is an "upgrade" to aluminum. There is more controversy over this than there is in regulator brands. It's just a TANK. It holds your breathing gas. Who cares if it's aluminum or steel?

-Charles

From I have gleaned there are two issues that Steel is thought to be better:

1. You can buy tanks with more capacity (100's, 120's)
2. Steel is neutraly bouyant so you carry less weight. I did see 5lb weight that goes inside the boot on a al80 on E-bay which looked interesting.

mwhities
02-15-2008, 13:10
Steel is heavier.. therefore; you can get more air in a steel than you can in aluminum and it's a smaller tank. (Ohh and less weights in your bcd. (BP/W or Jacket BCD).

At least that's what I think. :)

mike_s
02-15-2008, 13:31
2. Steel is neutraly bouyant so you carry less weight. I did see 5lb weight that goes inside the boot on a al80 on E-bay which looked interesting.


I think you meant steel is negative bouyant, not neutraly (so you carry less weight).



to the original question asker:

My reasons why steel tanks are prefered:
1.) They are more negative bouyant. So dont' have to wear as much weight on your weighbelt
2.) They hold more air/gas. Steel is stronger and steel tanks have thinner walls. The same physical size HP steel tank will hold about 25% more gas than an AL80. (using HP100 to AL80 comparison)
3.) They are more compact for the amount of air/gas held.
4.) you can overpump steel tanks. (LP steel tanks).
5.) Dive operators prefer the LP steel tanks as their compressors don't have to work as hard for the same amount (cubic feet) of air/gas


Biggest negatives.

1.) They cost more than AL tanks
2.) Some dive operators have inadequate compressor systems to fill HP tanks completely.

DarinMartell
02-15-2008, 13:32
2. Steel is neutraly bouyant so you carry less weight. I did see 5lb weight that goes inside the boot on a al80 on E-bay which looked interesting.


I think you meant steel is negative bouyant. (so you carry less weight).


Sorry, I stand corrected.

CompuDude
02-15-2008, 13:37
if you decide to upgrade to steel later.

I keep hoping that some day, somebody will present a reasonable argument as to why steel is an "upgrade" to aluminum. There is more controversy over this than there is in regulator brands. It's just a TANK. It holds your breathing gas. Who cares if it's aluminum or steel?

There's no controversy. Steel is simply better, with a small number of specific exceptions.

Al.80s are fine if that's what you want. They have their place, and there's nothing inherently wrong with them. But steel IS an upgrade.

mwhities
02-15-2008, 13:40
Use them as stage bottles later; if you go tech. :)

texdiveguy
02-15-2008, 13:58
Someone above stated that steel was an 'upgrade' over Al tanks......I don't see it that way. Both have good applications and both materials fill a specific purpose for divers. I have both in service in different uses.

mike_s
02-15-2008, 14:04
Used Catalina Super 80 Scuba Tank



one minor thing to note about this tank.

It's a "Super 80". nothing wrong with that. it just has a few minor different characteristics over a regular AL80. It's shorter, fatter and hs better buoyancy characteristics. (you'll prob actually prefer it over the AL80)




Manufacturer & Nominal Capacity| Service pressure, psi | Actual air capacity, ft3 | Outer diameter, in | Length without valve, in| Empty weight, lbs (w/o valve)| Buoyancy Empty, lbs (w/valve)| Buoyancy Full, lbs (w/valve)
Luxfer 80 | 3000 | 77.4| 7.25| 26.06| 31.38| 4.4| -1.4
Luxfer S80| 3000| 78.2| 8| 22.93| 35.12| 2.26|-3.6


EDIT: Scubatoys Vbulletion sw must not support tables to make it look better.

DarinMartell
05-05-2008, 12:50
I am now an OWNER! It took longer to make the decsion then I wanted but I had a certain performance goal at work i gave myself before I could buy them. Luckily they where still available. They have 2 years left on Hydro, They performed a vis on the yesterday so I am set for a year, and they filled them for me! Not bad for $140.

The only question I have is this. I was wondering about the "Super 80" designation becuase no internet searches came up with Catalina making a "super" model. I asked him when I picked them up and he said the the "S" in S80 means super 80 and that I can fill them up to 3300. I did some more research and acording to the Catalina website the "S" means the tank was made for scuba and that the max pressure is 3000. I don't really mind, could be an honest mistake if he is used to working f=with Luxfer tanks. He owns a dive charter boat not a shop and he put these up on his website on consignment.

My question is, do I want to bleed the tanks down to 3000PSI to be safe or are they ok at the 3300 he filled them to?

mike_s
05-05-2008, 12:53
the DOT rated tank pressure should be stamped on the tank.

go by the DOT stamped rating and that only. (not what pressure rating you read on some website. Don't go creating new problems that you don't need.. read and use whats on the tank. ).



EDIT. here is a chart to tell you how to read those tank numbers. If you need help, feel free to post the EXACT stamping characters on the tank and folks here will be glad to help.

http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i114/mikes2006/tanks/tank_read_alum_tank.gif

DarinMartell
05-05-2008, 13:03
Thanks, I know it is 3000 and he was mistaken. Still think I got a good deal. Do I need to bleed these down to 3000 to be safe?

DarinMartell
05-05-2008, 13:40
I just got the following e-mail back from the seller:

"Hello Darin,
They are Catalina super 80’s not the Luxfer short and fat ones, they are standard height and diameter. Super 80’s are permissible for a 10% overfill. They are filled and VIP is valid for one year.
Thanks,
Bob"


But the markings say: DOT-3AL3000 s21051M4002-01 93 - S80

He is wrong about the overfill isn't he?

mike_s
05-05-2008, 13:45
I've never heard of an Aluminum tank that allowed for a 10% overfill.

only certain LP steel tanks with the + (plus) rating after the fill pressure allow the 10% overfill, to my knowledge.

Does the pressure rating mark on your tank have a plus symbol (+) after it? If not, I doubt they are rated for overfill.


But the markins say: DOT-3AL3000 s21051M4002-01 93 - S80

I don't see a + in the above markings you posted, so I'm betting he's wrong.


Thanks, I know it is 3000 and he was mistaken. Still think I got a good deal. Do I need to bleed these down to 3000 to be safe?

I wouldn't worry about it. bleed them down on your next upcoming dive :D (unless these are the old alloy tanks, then I'd bleed them down. but they aren't based on the original hydro date of 1993).

I've had a tank monkey accidently overfill my AL80's to 3800 psi and they didn't blow (remember that hydro test pressure is 5/3rd the rated pressure stamping.) When I noticed it at 3800 as he was filling it, I did tell him to bleed them down because it was so much higher...... I'm just glad I caught it or if he really wan't paying attention it could have gotten 'much worse'.

but I wouldn't worry about 3300psi.

DarinMartell
05-05-2008, 14:03
Thanks, all in all I am very happy with my first full sized tank purchase. Now I just have to find someone who can go out with me on Thursdays or Fridays and i will be all set!

ChrisA
05-05-2008, 14:12
if you decide to upgrade to steel later.I keep hoping that some day, somebody will present a reasonable argument as to why steel is an "upgrade" to aluminum. There is more controversy over this than there is in regulator brands. It's just a TANK. It holds your breathing gas. Who cares if it's aluminum or steel?

-Charles

The two advantages to steel are


You can buy them in more sizes and more fill pressures so you can better match the tank to your needs.
They are negative even when empty so you can typicaly remove 6 to 8 pounds off your weight belt.I dive at the beach in colder water so the above matters a lot to me. If there is a big steep hill I need to climb down then back up I can use a little light steel 72, same if I know the dive is shallow. But I use my bigger tanks for longer deeper dives.

mike_s
05-05-2008, 14:31
The two advantages to steel are

You can buy them in more sizes and more fill pressures so you can better match the tank to your needs.
They are negative even when empty so you can typicaly remove 6 to 8 pounds off your weight belt.I dive at the beach in colder water so the above matters a lot to me. If there is a big steep hill I need to climb down then back up I can use a little light steel 72, same if I know the dive is shallow. But I use my bigger tanks for longer deeper dives.


3rd advantage.

3. HP steel tanks have a larger capacity for about the same weight/dimensions as an AL tank. For example. a HP100 is about the same exact size as an AL80. But the AL80 holds 77cf of air, and the HP100 holds 100cf of air. a 25% increase in gas capacity.

cummings66
05-07-2008, 10:32
I think that steel is a nice material for cylinders and I do see that there is a use for the aluminum cylinders too. For most of my diving steel is about the only thing I use, well, it has been for the last 3 years when I got my first steel cylinders.

The advantages of them have been discussed here, there, elsewhere and for the most part people get it.

mm2002
05-11-2008, 19:36
Thanks, I know it is 3000 and he was mistaken. Still think I got a good deal. Do I need to bleed these down to 3000 to be safe?

For what it's worth, my LDS fills everything to 3500 psi. AL63, AL80, HP100, HP120, doesn't matter. Every time we get our tanks filled, they are at 3500. The way I see it is that all of those tanks are hydro'd at a much higher pressure than that, so I just don't worry about it. I enjoy the extra air!