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Thread: Trim Issue

  1. #11
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    Yeah, it's between 30-45 degrees off, so pretty severe.

    I'd also guess head-HEAVY, with you over-compensating. If so, Gombessa's advice is spot on.

  2. #12
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    You mention that you're not aware that you're heads-up. A good check (mentioned by Larry about a year ago), is: while swimming, put your chin to your chest. If you see the bottom, then you are heads-up. If you see water behind you, then you're level. He mentioned that this is how he keeps track of students behind him.
    rick

  3. #13
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    Yeah, while I am moving I do not really notice. Then all of a sudden I will think about it and realize that I am head up a bit and try to correct, but I keep slipping right back to it... I will try the suggestions and see what happens...

    Thanks
    Phil
    For current Midwest Diving Conditions go to www.midwestmuckdiving.com. They cannot be current unless you help. Please post any updates that you may have for whatever quarry or lake you just came out of...

  4. #14
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    Your back should be arched and shoulders back. I find that when I relax the back or glutes, my trim goes all out of whack. It also sounds like you are too heavy. If you can hover at 10 feet with 500 psi in your tanks, no air in wing or suit, then you are perfectly weighted. When learning to dive doubles, it takes quite a few dives to get everything dialed in. Then you get to buy multiple backplates, wings, etc.

  5. #15
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    I have found that I can hold a stop at 10 ft with no weight but I feel a bit floaty... I feel like I am fighting it a bit to stay down... Maybe that is because I have been putting some weight on these last 8 months. So I have thrown a few lbs on a belt. I have only had my doubles down to 500 psi twice. That is one thing that I need to do a bit more of, and try things out. It all comes down to dive dive dive...

    Thanks again to everyone

    Phil
    For current Midwest Diving Conditions go to www.midwestmuckdiving.com. They cannot be current unless you help. Please post any updates that you may have for whatever quarry or lake you just came out of...

  6. #16
    Isn't that the answer to most diving questions... dive dive dive.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ppo2_diver View Post
    ..... If you can hover at 10 feet with 500 psi in your tanks, no air in wing or suit, then you are perfectly weighted....
    I don't agree with this part at ALL and personally think its a dangerous way to dive. 'Perfectly' weighted is zero psi at the surface and neutral. Realisticly, a pound or so negative is better to cover overbreathing and increasing your residual lung volume. Anything else gives you the oppurtunity to be positively buoyant when you don't want to be.

    If you don't agree - think of what would happen with a total gas failure and total gas loss during the ascent as you breathe from a donated reg.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by in_cavediver View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ppo2_diver View Post
    ..... If you can hover at 10 feet with 500 psi in your tanks, no air in wing or suit, then you are perfectly weighted....
    I don't agree with this part at ALL and personally think its a dangerous way to dive. 'Perfectly' weighted is zero psi at the surface and neutral. Realisticly, a pound or so negative is better to cover overbreathing and increasing your residual lung volume. Anything else gives you the oppurtunity to be positively buoyant when you don't want to be.

    If you don't agree - think of what would happen with a total gas failure and total gas loss during the ascent as you breathe from a donated reg.
    Here we go again. FWIW, I agree.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by in_cavediver View Post
    If you don't agree - think of what would happen with a total gas failure and total gas loss during the ascent as you breathe from a donated reg.
    In double LP120s (the worst case I can think of, i.e. large LP cylinders) the difference would be less than 3.5# of lift (well within tidal lung capacity). Personally, I'd be just fine (as would any competent diver). THAT SAID, I, too, would just check buoyancy with around 200 psi. Realize, however, with "typical" doubles (e.g. HP100, LP85s, etc) the difference between checking with 500 psi and empty is about one or two pounds of positive buoyancy. Not a big deal.

    Edit: And that's for air/nitrox. The difference is even SMALLER with mix.
    Last edited by Rainer; 02-07-2009 at 15:50.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rainer View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by in_cavediver View Post
    If you don't agree - think of what would happen with a total gas failure and total gas loss during the ascent as you breathe from a donated reg.
    In double LP120s (the worst case I can think of, i.e. large LP cylinders) the difference would be less than 3.5# of lift (well within tidal lung capacity). Personally, I'd be just fine (as would any competent diver). THAT SAID, I, too, would just check buoyancy with around 200 psi. Realize, however, with "typical" doubles (e.g. HP100, LP85s, etc) the difference between checking with 500 psi and empty is about one or two pounds of positive buoyancy. Not a big deal.

    Edit: And that's for air/nitrox. The difference is even SMALLER with mix.
    This makes my point exactly! With my 104's, its around [email protected] That translates to roughly 3lbs. 3 stinking pounds more wieght so you don't have that issue if you find yourself with empty tanks. At that point, you are already loaded with stressors why add more. (total gas failure is one hell of a stressor imho). The total gas weight for a cave filled set is 21.5lbs (104's @ 3600 or 284cft). Really, what is the difference between 18lbs negative and 21 lbs negative?

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