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Thread: DIR?

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  1. #1
    Grouper Founding Member
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    I see no one has posted in this forum yet, so I decided to stir up those waters. [img]smileys/smiley1.gif[/img]

    I'm all confused about this DIR thing (forgive me, I'm newbie). Why is called Doing It Right, and if that is true am I DIW (Doing It Wrong) since I'm taking NAUI OW? Just want to get idea of what is it, and if I'm missing something that I shouldn't.



  2. #2
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    http://www.gue.com

    Should provide you with your answers.

    Michael

    Please PM me if you need any help.

  3. #3
    Grand Master Spammer Founding Member
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    DIR is an old acronym that divers are trying to move away from for that very reason. The divers that subscribe to that diving philosophy do indeed feel that there is a safer, more flexible way of doing things than is currently taught in most classes, but the "DIR" moniker just has too much negative connotations at this point.

    GUE is the organization that leads the [formerly] DIR training system.

    There is no problem with starting off by taking NAUI OW courses, however. If you're interested, GUE can continue your education once you have learned the basics of diving, but at this point they do not teach beginning divers.


  4. #4
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    Ohh and as a matter of fact.... I'm SSI OW and I will eventually take GUE/DIR Fundies but, I'm going to poke Joe and get him to set me up with NAUI AOW course. I like the things I've been hearing about NAUI. It's not like any other agency in the aspect that you can only teach what they want and it's usually the bare minimum.

    So, I say go for the NAUI OW and AOW and whatever else. Get a lot of dives under your belt so you can find "your style" of diving. If DIR suits you.... go for it. If not, then you will find your way.

    Michael

    Michael

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  5. #5
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    Get their book, it's pretty interesting and will probably give you things to think about.
    <DIV></DIV>
    <DIV>My only beef with them is that the failure rate is so high, I don't buy the fail and come back later bit. I believe a course should be long enough to impart the knowledge and skills needed to pass it, assuming average intellect and abilities.</DIV>
    <DIV></DIV>
    <DIV>If the course is so hard that nobody can absorb the data being presented in it's entirety then break it up into sections so that you can manage it. To make it almost mandatory to fail is IMO it's only failing and one of the reasons I haven't taken it yet.</DIV>
    <DIV></DIV>
    <DIV>That said, I like to take a course that I know will challenge me, one that I know I might fail if I don't buckle down and study and work on the skills. But I want a course that if I do my part Iwill pass it.</DIV>
    <DIV></DIV>
    <DIV>Could I pass it? Who knows? Probably not from what I understand. From what I've been told if you're good they expect more from you, so a better diver would fail it when Imight pass it because he was tested to a tougher standard.</DIV>
    <DIV></DIV>
    <DIV>PS, I've seen some mighty good DIR divers in the water. Some of the best skills around, but I've seen the equal in technical divers as well.</DIV>

  6. #6
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    Considering the training, the distinction between DIR divers and technical divers is murky at best, although from the DIR perspective it of course comes down to team philosophies and details of gear configuration.

    I'll taking the Fundamentals course in Sept. I'll be quite surprised if I pass, as pleasing as would be to do so. That's ok, though... even if I don't "pass" (and what does "pass" mean to you, in this context?), I'll have been given the groundwork for what to work on, and can simply re-test later down the line... you don't have to take the entire class over again unless they actually FAIL you (which means essentially you are an unsafe diver who should reevaluate getting back into the water).


  7. #7
    Grouper Founding Member
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    One thing that struck me while reading though their web site was the dogmatic view on the equipment used. It seams to restrictive the way that everything is prescribed. For example, the location of your dive knife and the type of fins! Can
    someone explain me why one can't use split fins (I love my Bio fins)?

    I do agree with them when it comes to streamlining, which can help reduce drag and from there the fatigue on the diver.


  8. #8
    TadPole Founding Member
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    Venio,

    First a qualification on my level. I've only done NAUI Intro to Tech, and only have minimal dives outside of recreational limits. There's others on here more qualified to give the reasons behind the restrictive nature of gear recommendations, but I'll give it a shot.

    "Technical" diving can be many things, but in general, you're diving outside of recreational limits. The risks are considerably greater, and you have less of a margin for error if something goes wrong. Part of the restrictive nature is the durability of gear (not to imply that other gear is unreliable), and minimization of potential failure points. A major part, though, is in the event of an emergency situation, having everyone equipped the same way, there's no "figuring out" how someone has their gear configured. Everything is in exactly the same place on everyone, so in total darkness, you still know exactly where a particular piece of gear is located, reducing response time.

    As for split fins... there are certain finning techniques that splits just don't do well. Swimming backwards, for instance. I took Intro with my Apollo Bios, and then immediately went out and bought a pair of blades.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venio
    One thing that struck me while reading though their web site was the dogmatic view on the equipment used. It seams to restrictive the way that everything is prescribed. For example, the location of your dive knife and the type of fins! Can
    someone explain me why one can't use split fins (I love my Bio fins)?

    I do agree with them when it comes to streamlining, which can help reduce drag and from there the fatigue on the diver.
    Many reasons why you can't use splits. First in wrecks and caves, splits have a nasty tendency to get tangled in the lines. Second, in the conditions technical cave and wreck diving is done, the most commonly used kick is a the frog kick, to avoid silting, which can be deadly in confined spaces like that. Split fins are fun and easy to kick, and you CAN frog kick in them, but not as efficiently as you can with paddle fins. Other kicks such as the backwards kick (where you actually swim backwards!) are nearly impossible to do in splits.

    The thing to realize about DIR gear requirements is this: There are two main concerns. The first is team standardization... everyone needs to have their gear set up the exact same way. No surprises in an emergency. The second is that they promote learning something ONCE and not having to change it, no matter how your dive conditions change. As a result, a lot of things that seem silly and overkill on an easy reef dive within the NDLs are of critical importance while cave diving or doing a wreck penetration dive at 200'. The Law of Primacy dictates you remember how to do something the way you were first taught it, best. As a result, the best way to learn a skill is to learn the way you will using it in the future. Being familiar with a standard DIR gear configuration means nothing needs to change, no matter how far your diving takes you. You can wear the EXACT SAME rig diving an easy 40' reef as you do diving 250' down in a cave.

    Standardization is everything when you're in really dangerous overhead conditions, and DIR gear is carefully thought out to be the most reliable gear configuration for those dangerous conditions. Again, much of that is not needed for an easy tour around a shallow quarry or reef. But by being familiar with it, you're not getting used to new gear in new places when you take the same rig into the wreck.

  10. #10
    Guppy Founding Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by cummings66
    <DIV>My only beef with them is that the failure rate is so high, I don't buy the fail and come back later bit.
    </DIV>
    <DIV></DIV>
    <DIV>I've always wondered about this. The course costs a chunk of change at something like $550 for weekend I believe. </DIV>
    <DIV>If you fail, do you have to pay another $550? </DIV>
    <DIV>Then, if you fail again, do you have to pay another $550?</DIV>
    <DIV>Or, do they just stick with you until you pass?</DIV>
    <DIV>Just wondering.</DIV>

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