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Thread: hovering

  1. #11
    Barracuda Founding Member
    Join Date
    07/13/2007
    Location
    Auburn, AL
    Posts
    1,811
    Heh, the DC600 is slow? You would have gone into rage using the DC500

    Buy a strobe or two, that'll help.

  2. #12
    Guppy
    Join Date
    07/16/2007
    Location
    Dallas, Tx
    Age
    56
    Posts
    132
    Images
    1
    I notice that fish have distance comfort zones and interpret body language.

    The comfort zone is fairly easy to determine if you carefully watch them.
    Most react in a similar way. If you slowly float in using very small movements
    there will be a point that you will begin to see their eyes start to look around.
    Go a little bit closer and many will begin to slightly move their heads.
    You have now gotten as close as you are going to get to this fish.
    He is looking for his escape route. Go any closer and he darts away and
    all you will get is a blurry fish butt.

    I have studied Cichlids that I have in my fresh water aquarium over
    the years and they do perceive certain positions as aggressive or passive
    between themselves when determining pecking order and male dominance.
    They perceive a downward stance as aggressive. So when a fish wants to
    indicate he gives up during a conflict, he will raise his head and tip his tail down.
    The winner will assume a head down position over the loser.

    This same "body language" applies to people looking into the tank.
    If you walk up and look down at the fish they will scatter and hide.
    Yet crawl up to the tank with your head below the level of the bottom
    of the tank an look up, the fish will come out and investigate you even
    if you head is pushed up to the glass.

    I have observed this same behavior in many fish in the ocean as well.
    If you come in horizontal you can get closer than if you come in
    head down/feet up. On a steep reef, I can get closer if I angle my feet
    down slightly and shoot up slightly.

    Some fish, will let you get very close (within inches) if you move in
    slowly with a full horizontal position and nearly no visible body motions.
    Trumpet fish are great example of this. They assume you don't see them.
    I have had them literally up against my mask for minutes at a time.
    Jawfish will come out sooner and further if you stay back a bit in a
    horizontal position nearly on the bottom vs over them looking down
    on them.

    Also, holding arms out fully extended scares off some fish. I think
    they must perceive the extended arms as big mouth coming after them.
    Some fish will let you get much closer if you hold the camera closer
    to you without extending your arms.

    Just some of things I've noticed and use when I take pictures.

    --- bill

  3. #13
    Grouper
    Join Date
    08/13/2007
    Location
    Spring, Texas
    Posts
    476
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    16
    The DC600 will do a good job, but you have to know its limits. I found reading the manual, I know, I know, but it helped a lot, really.

  4. #14
    Grouper
    Join Date
    08/13/2007
    Location
    Spring, Texas
    Posts
    476
    Images
    16
    Make sure to employ the sea mode, it uses a red filter to help with the color balance.

  5. #15
    TadPole
    Join Date
    07/23/2008
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    33
    Are you using a strobe or just the internal flash?

  6. #16
    Grouper
    Join Date
    05/06/2008
    Location
    United States-Central Texas
    Posts
    294
    "I have observed this same behavior in many fish in the ocean as well. If you come in horizontal you can get closer than if you come in head down/feet up. On a steep reef, I can get closer if I angle my feet down slightly and shoot up slightly."
    __________________________________
    Good tip........sounds like you've done quite a bit of shootin'. Thanks.
    "Are there any brave men left in Washington or are they all cowards?"

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