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Thread: Challenging Emergency Scenarios

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Charon View Post
    I wonder if it has anything to do with being trained in relatively lo-vis and pretty cold water? One of the instructors remarked that the "people in the caribbean" love divers trained up here because they know they don't have to worry about them, that the conditions in the carribbean are so mild compared to here.

    Don't know if it's true but I find diving up here a wee bit harder than in warm, clear water. Between the thick neoprene, the added weight, the nav problems, etc., it's just not as much fun. It's gotten so my dives here are to practice skills and pick up junk that doesn't belong in the water. If I see anything interesting I count it as a bonus. I live for my 2 week trips and wall to wall diving in shorts and a T-shirt.
    I think you are spot on. I always try to be good at everything I do. When I learned to dive in the Caribbean I felt I was a very good diver. It wasn't until I tried diving in Canada lakes (low viz, cold) that I was really challenged and became an even better diver. I didn't hear statements like "my card was simply a learners permit that allowed me to go out and perfect the skills" when I was a Caribbean diver. It was one of the first things I heard when I started diving in Canada.

    I still remember diving lakes in Texas and thinking, this is great. So much easier than diving the St. Lawrence River. Then I'd help someone who only did Caribbean diving and they'd ask me how does anyone get used to diving in Texas Lakes.

    P.S. my first Canadian instructor starts her training with, "Anyone can scuba dive. You don't need training to scuba dive. The training you are about to receive is to reduce the chance you will die."
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  2. #12
    Megalodon
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    I do have to agree with you SD888. When you're used to 10' vis and you get 100'+ and used to 56f water and get 80f, you've died and gone to scuba heaven.

    My first class was patterned after the Combat Dvier training in the military: Teach you the skills then stress the hell out of you while doing those skills. Not the best teaching method, but still, 40 years later, that training has stuck with me. It came in handy on more than one occasion and not necessarily with an emergency:

    I rented a reg set up that had a SPG that read in kPa, the DM asked what I was used to reading and when I said "PSI", he let me know since he didn't have a psi guage and I would probably not be able to dive that spg. I did the dive after hooking it up to a tank, seeing what full was and what 1/4 full was and then letting them know I was ready to go. I had to explain that even though I didn't dive kPA readings, a guage needle moves the same no matter what the scale is, it should start full and end closer to empty. All I needed to know is whether or not I had a short fill.

    Another that I related here before was a slow leak to a power inflator that was easily fixed by disconnecting it until it was needed.

    I once saved a man in Wichita just to watch him dive...(inventor)

  3. #13
    Barracuda
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    I had my grandson trained bu ST at a quarry so he would learn to die in lo vis water. My first cert was done by BSAC in 1970. They were very tough on divers with lots a training that has stuck with me even with an absence from diving for years. When I got recertified over 40 years later I was surprise how much I remembered. This was due to the great job they did. Safety before anything, be prepared, and test your equiptment before each dive, plus the skills were still there. I think current training is not as thourgh as nit should be but then would take a lot longer.

  4. #14
    Grouper
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    Quote Originally Posted by scubadiver888 View Post
    P.S. my first Canadian instructor starts her training with, "Anyone can scuba dive. You don't need training to scuba dive. The training you are about to receive is to reduce the chance you will die."
    I really like this. Thanks.
    Abandon all hope ...

  5. #15
    Barracuda Founding Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcr0112 View Post
    I I think current training is not as thourgh as nit should be but then would take a lot longer.
    True. My original training in 1982 was six weeks long, and they put us through the ringer. Most folks today would balk at that sort of time commitment.
    John Lewis--the PlatypusMan!


  6. #16
    Megalodon
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    Maybe someone needs to come up with an "Old School Scuba Class" Specialty cert.

    "I'm an Advanced Open diver, what's your cert?"

    "Old School"

    "oh, WOW!!!"

    I once saved a man in Wichita just to watch him dive...(inventor)

  7. #17
    My second instructor (who taught me to dive in Canada) got permission from PADI to give a specialty OW certification. I think she called it OW Plus or something like that. Wasn't quite "Old School" but it was a lot harder to pass and took a few 3-day weekends to complete.
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  8. #18
    Barracuda
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    I believe that the "old school" divers who learned before gauges,BCD's, Octo's using a "J" valve are more prepared to react to certain emergencies. Out of air & emergency ascents were taught and practiced so if one happened now training would take over.

  9. #19
    Megalodon
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    Yeah, but we also dies with a greater frequency too....

    I once saved a man in Wichita just to watch him dive...(inventor)

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