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Thread: Challenging Emergency Scenarios

  1. #1
    Barracuda Founding Member
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    Question Challenging Emergency Scenarios

    http://forscubadivers.com/scuba-divi...-scuba-divers/

    This article presents us with several emergencies that we as divers might face over time.

    Did they hit the most urgent ones? Did they miss any?

    Talk about it in the comments below!
    John Lewis--the PlatypusMan!


  2. #2
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    Seriously??? IMO the article was lame at best. Many superficial "emergencies". Some serious ones not listed some not even discussed, just listed.
    Abandon all hope ...

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charon View Post
    Seriously??? IMO the article was lame at best. Many superficial "emergencies". Some serious ones not listed some not even discussed, just listed.
    I don't think we should blow off the article. I agree that someone that dives regularly and has quite a bit of experience isn't likely to have any of these become a problem...

    BUT

    If we don't talk about it someone may have a problem that could have been easily avoided or handled.

    This year I was diving with a group. One of the "once a year" divers had a leak in his auto inflator. To stop the leak he unplugged the hose. Simple enough until he got to 100' and wanted to add air. He could have hooked it back up or orally inflated, he didn't. He kicked like hell until he was over breathing and needed help. Everything worked out fine and he was only a little embarrassed back on the boat when he realized how simple the fix was.
    We have all been annoyed when a reg free flows and the person doesn't know how to turn it down to stop it.
    One of the funniest things I have ever seen was an instructors eyes get big when his mouth piece came off. May not have been as funny if it had been my teenage son.
    Several years ago, on a live aboard night dive, my insta-buddy lost the boat. This kid had horrendous gas management, he was out of air at least 4 times on the trip. When he realized he was low on air again and couldn't see the boat he bolted, not for the surface, horizontally. I couldn't keep up. Rather than stay with his buddy or ascend while he still had air he ran out swimming in the wrong direction. This kid had 9 lives, everybody on the boat was lucky he couldn't kill himself.

    All of these things seem simple to you or I, but only because we have thought about them. I like the article because somebody out there now has a piece of new information that they are thinking about.
    Originally from the Great White North, I give you...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charon View Post
    Some serious ones not listed some not even discussed, just listed.
    That's what this thread is for--to talk about what was missed, what wasn't, and what we think should be covered in more detail.

    We all learn as a result.
    John Lewis--the PlatypusMan!


  5. #5
    I'd agree with PACKRMAN on this one. I get the feeling that the majority of 'divers' are people who go diving with rental gear while on vacation maybe once a year. When they get home they don't practice any skills in a pool.

    I have never seen or heard of a stuck inflator here in Ontario. I was the guy who cleaned the rental gear. Thus avoidance was the way I ensured people renting our gear didn't have to deal with a stuck inflator. I had seen someone test the inflator before getting in the water and it just kept going. This was in the Caribbean. The dive guide would then bang the inflator against his hand until it stopped inflating. The diver foolishly accepted this and used the gear.

    For BC won't inflate I would add that you want to try and pull the inflator hose off the inflator. A few times I thought it was on firmly but I was able to pull it off because it was not properly on the inflator.

    The regulator free-flow example said to make sure there is no salt or mineral. I find that improper maintenance is more likely to cause a free-flow. Just saying it is serviced for cold water isn't always sufficient. There are regulators that either breathe hard at the surface and fine at depth or they breathe well at the surface and free-flow at depth (by depth I'm talking 100+ feet). If the person servicing the regulator knows you never go below 60 feet then they might tune it to breathe better above 60 feet. If they know you will be cold water diving below 100 feet they will definitely tune it to not free-flow at depth. Of course the solution if you are doing some shallow diving in warm water and deep diving in cold water is to get a better regulator which is less likely to breathe hard, ever, and does not free-flow at depth.

    A lot of the answers is proper maintenance. This is probably the best answer. I would also add that you need to practice your skills. If you learn how to deal with an emergency situation during certification then never practice the skill again, when you need the skill you will have totally forgotten it. Struggling with a forgotten skill will probably make things worse. Figuring out how you can practice the skill without actually putting yourself in danger is the second best thing you can do.

    I won't go on to comment on the rest of the situations but I do recommend people who are occasional divers should probably read the article and talk about it with people here. Charon and others know this stuff and the article isn't really helpful to them BUT it is perfectly acceptable for it to be valuable to other less experienced divers. Ask questions, talk about it. Then you'll be as knowledgable about it as Charon. If you don't ask questions, you'll never learn.

    Smart people ask questions. So read the article and ask away.
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  6. #6
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    I've had D/M's ask during dive if my reg was bad because I'm using my Oto. I signal no an switch back After the dive the always ask why was I using my Octo. I tell them it's just practice switching & seeing how it breaths underwater . I practice skills all the time & only dive maybe times a year

  7. #7
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    I guess my cert training was (possibly) more thorough or maybe I just took it all more seriously. I was told early on that my card was simply a learners permit that allowed me to go out and perfect the skills I had been introduced to. I was also told to do that one skill at a time, stepwise. First, get weighting down perfectly. Next, get trim down perfectly. Next, ...

    I also wanted to be safe and independent no matter who I was (or was not) diving with so I progressed to solo. I also do all my own maintence except for hydros and vis. I can see where someone who only dove on short annual trips or was casual about skills would need this article, so +1 for Packerman. Thanks for making that point. Sometimes (mostly?) I'm somewhat oblivious.

    To prove that, I totally missed that there was a link to the full article. My apologies!!! That was lame of me. It was a pretty good article when I got to read the whole thing.

    One thing I think they might have included is getting narked. If you only dive occasionally and don't know the symptoms, it could be deadly. (Or did they and I missed that too?)
    Abandon all hope ...

  8. #8
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    Didn't see it and agree 100%.
    Originally from the Great White North, I give you...

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Charon View Post
    I guess my cert training was (possibly) more thorough or maybe I just took it all more seriously. I was told early on that my card was simply a learners permit that allowed me to go out and perfect the skills I had been introduced to. I was also told to do that one skill at a time, stepwise. First, get weighting down perfectly. Next, get trim down perfectly. Next, ...
    You are the exception to the rule. My first training was good but not great. When I started diving in Canada I got trained again. That training was a lot more like what you described.

    I've since been involved in doing refreshers with people. When I start working with them they realize how little they were taught. Most are happy to learn more and be a better diver. This is why I think it is important to just getting people talking.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by scubadiver888 View Post
    You are the exception to the rule. My first training was good but not great. When I started diving in Canada I got trained again. That training was a lot more like what you described.
    I wonder if it has anything to do with being trained in relatively lo-vis and pretty cold water? One of the instructors remarked that the "people in the caribbean" love divers trained up here because they know they don't have to worry about them, that the conditions in the carribbean are so mild compared to here.

    Don't know if it's true but I find diving up here a wee bit harder than in warm, clear water. Between the thick neoprene, the added weight, the nav problems, etc., it's just not as much fun. It's gotten so my dives here are to practice skills and pick up junk that doesn't belong in the water. If I see anything interesting I count it as a bonus. I live for my 2 week trips and wall to wall diving in shorts and a T-shirt.
    Abandon all hope ...

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